any ways to increase milk output?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by J C Collins, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Hi everyone. It's been over two weeks now since my milk goat came into my heart. I have a 1 1/2 year old Nubian, I don't know anything of her background like when she kidded, etc. I get a quart of milk from her every day with 2 milkings. Is this about average? Is there any way to increase her milk output without harming her? Thanks for the help. J C
     
  2. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Beer worked for me...but that was when I was breastfeeding my human babies.
     

  3. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    the more you milk her the more milk she will give. this doe is at your place for two weeks? she still is not aclimated and probably will not come to her full potencial after next freshening. can't you ask the breeder when she kidded and how much milk she had? how does her udder feel like? soft and pliable or tight with hard spots? is it even? what do you feed her now? was she dewormed when she came to you?
     
  4. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    I'm new to goats with two milkers (Lamanchas) who each give a half gallon a day. One is a first freshener who's production is going down a little but it's only her first year. I hear their production improves after the second freshening, but each doe is unique.

    I think a quart for a Nubian is a little low, but it's her first year. Perhaps her lactation curve is going down, depending on how long ago she kidded.

    I've wondered the same if does will increase milk amount if they are milked thoroughly and more frequently than usual, just like in human breastfeeding. In all my reading, though, I've never seen INCREASING milk production, just maintaining what you have already, which is highest directly after kidding then decreases until you let her dry up and rest two months or so prior to kidding again.

    I have an easy doe and a hard doe, but I make sure their bag is wrinkly and very soft before I let them go. The four year old (the hard one) has tiny teats and takes forever to milk. I'll be able to crack walnuts between my thumb and forefinger, I think!
     
  5. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Although Nubians in general don't give as musch as some of the other breeds, you should be getting more than that unless your goat comes from a line that just doesn't produce much...you can't change genetics but you can improve your management.

    Is she getting alfalfa in any form? Alfalfa makes milk. Start her slowly on alfalfa pellets (or hay) and increase until she is eating all she wants every day (free choice) keep the pellets in front of her full time all the time...but start slow to keep from upsetting her stomach.

    Make sure she has fresh water at all times..

    also, good loose goat minerals.

    feed her grain mix on the milkstands twice a day. My mix is posted on another thred...the "beet pulp" thread. I do not use sweet feed of any kind. it upsets stomachs and the milk tastes better without it. you can go to that thread and check out my mix.

    when you milk, you must completely empty the bag each time, I mean "udder". Supply and demand. Goats peak at 2-3 months then they slowly give less and less. learn your milking routine and technique and feeding skills now and shoot for a great next year...don't give up.practice makes perfect....and be sure to use a buck from great milking lines, not just any buck, so that your doe's daughters will give even more milk if you intend to keep one....and if you intend to sell her daughters, you will be selling daughters that are improved
     
  6. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Thanks to all for your help. She has been with me for two weeks, I know they were rough because she is only now making "friends" with one of my Boer does. The others ignore her now, but it was rough. I milk about 12 hours apart, but notice that I get more in the evening. It has increased to 2 cups in the a.m. and 3 in the p.m. She was crawling with lice and needed a trimming (fur and hooves) when I got her, she has had all necessary things done to improve her life now. I only paid $100 for her and I bet that is why she was offered for sale because she doesn't give as much milk as her previous owner would have liked. She didn't even have a name. She gets grain (C&G Grower Crunch from Hubbard) when she is milked and also can clean up whatevery is left in the big trough. She has access to hay/alfalfa all the time; I tried to show her the alfalfa pellets and she picked around them in her dinner! I had to enlarge her collar this a.m., so she is growing, I don't think she had grain at her previous home. There are just the three of us here to consume her milk, so when all is said and done it is 2 gallons a week approx. and that is enough for us. So, I am happy with her and she seems to be responding to me. Thank you all. I will try to "sneak" alfalfa pellets into her food again; I might have put TOO much in there the first time. She is pretty smart and the only goat that I have even just opened the pen door for and let her out free...she goes right to the milking barn 40 feet away and then she heads for her little patch of grass to nibble. I could kick myself for waiting so long to get a dairy goat, it is just plain fun.
     
  7. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Sounds like you are doing a great job......you minght want to consider the fact that she probably has worms........cydectin is a great womer as it has no milk withdrawal peiod. De-worming her should get her in even better shape and also help with milk production and over all health.
     
  8. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    I will get the cydectin for the worms. I had to loosed her collar yesterday, she is growing and her coat is not as coarse as it had been. I also found that she has sore mouth (I was so excited to get her I pretty much grabbed her and ran) so I am treating that by spraying Blue Cote on cotton balls and dabbing it on. It is pretty hard to see the scabs even when I know they are there, she is blackish fur around her mouth and dark skinned. She is not crazy for that, it must burn her. Is there an ointment that would work? I have udder balm in a green square tin, that is all. Someone told me to use iodine, but I can't find the tiny bottles of iodine anywhere. I have from Walmart Povodine 10% but when I read the label it says it is diluted to 1% and I wonder if that is strong enough. She is doing fine otherwise. Thanks for all your help. JC
     
  9. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Our goats won't eat alfalfa pellets at all. :shrug:
     
  10. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Iodine will help but can also damage the skin if used to much. My new cure all is tea tree oil. It has been working very well for me. Give it a try.

    Patty
     
  11. debd0712

    debd0712 Well-Known Member

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    My dairy goats will not eat alfalfa pellets when they are mixed in their grain, but gobble them down as fast as possible when given separately after milking.
    The Boers don't care if the pellets are mixed with grain - they will eat anything put in front of them.

    Debbie
     
  12. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Hi all, just an update: I tried the alfalfa pellets, she does not care for them no matter howthey are presented to her. I have done 3 applications of the Tea Tree Oil and she does not fight me when I do it. I put it on with a cotton ball twice a day, when she is done being milked. Is this enough? Things are looking better already, I think she is feeling better around the mouth, too. Thanks again, JC
     
  13. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    She sounds like a very lucky girl to have you as her new owner! What did you name her?
     
  14. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Well, she is Honey Rose. It sure beats #40. I just call her Rosie or "you sweet girlie." I changed grain to Purina and she seems to enjoy it more. Our a.m. milk is now OVER 2 cups and p.m. remains the same. She is quick to learn and getting along with everyone. I notice that these bumps are on her back, it is almost like scabs from running into something pokey. But I am giving them the tea tree oil and hoping for the best. Her mouth looks so much better. Thanks to all! JC
     
  15. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Just an update--the tea tree oil has worked wonders, my poor Rosie even had these sore mouth scabs in her nose. Her appetite is increasing, giving her oiler sunflower seeds to improve her skin condition. Thanks again to all! JC PS-milk has increased to 5 cups a day!!
     
  16. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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  17. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Hi everyone! Orf is soremouth, right? There are like three names for it, I can't recall them, but saw them on goat911 website. She is doing so well; when she is done eating instead of heading off to gobble grass, now she wants to stand still by me and let me pat her face and schmooze with her. She is quite a special girl! I know the former owner, I think there has been something that has happened family-wise, I don't want to pry. I know he does all he can to care for his goats. Things happen. If she hadn't had these problems I doubt if he would have offered her for sale and I would not have my wonderful Rosie. I kind of grabbed her and ran, anyhow; even if I had analyzed her there in the barn and seen the soremouth I still would have taken her.
     
  18. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    I am glad to hear your little girl is doing so much better - my Sadie likes to have her face gently rubbed and is a real schmoozer, too! I love her a lot! By the way, I give her a cup of alfalfa rabbit pellets to munch on with her other feed - she loves that and it makes a surprising difference in her milk production! I was told that the rabbit pellets don't have long enough fibers to provide her with proper roughage, so I make sure she also has her orchard grass or alfalfa hay, for balance...
     
  19. J C Collins

    J C Collins Member

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    Thanks for the tip with the rabbit pellets...guess who enjoys them!! The other goats are letting up on her, too. It's been a month that she has been with me and we have our routine, things are going fine. Thanks! JC