any tips on hauling goats cross country...?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by full sun, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. full sun

    full sun Well-Known Member

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    I am moving to North Carolina next month! :baby04: We are driving from Michigan with the 3 goats and 6 chickens. It should be about 10 hours and we are planning on driving straight through. I am putting the goats (NDs) in crates in the back of a pick-up with a cap. I know it won't be their best day ever, but they will get through, I am sure. Any tips? I have never even come close to doing anything like this. SO any suggestions on how they should eat or drink wouldbe appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Jennifer
     
  2. suzyhomemaker09

    suzyhomemaker09 Well-Known Member

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    Just thinking simply ...I'd not even give food...but offer water as much as you can...maybe every gas/pit stop you make...they will be most uncomfortable if they get wet from a spilled water dish, and you certainly don't want a bunch of car sick goats yacking all over the place either.
     

  3. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Travel in the cool of the night.
     
  4. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I wonder how hot it might get in the back of a truck with a cap. Used to ride in the back of a truck w/topper as a kid and we always cooked, even with the little side windows cranked open. If you have sliding rear windows in the truck and cap, I'd open them and get some A/c back there along with windows/vents completely open.

    They would get more ventilation & herd security if they were kept in one section of the truck with a cut down cattle panel. If they are crated, the crates should be big enough for them to stand and turn around in.

    Besides temp & ventilation, the other thing that will make them much more comfortable is good footing- rubber stock/wash mat is great in a crate or truck bed. If they have good footing, they will lie down and work on their cud or sleep most of the way. A truck bed, even with bedding, doesn't give them a secure enough footing and they won't lie down if they think they can't get up again. Ten hours of standing up would be very stressful!

    Get some "Bounce Back" or other electrolye powder from the farm store and get them used to the taste, and offer electrolyte water at stops. Would also start them on Probios a couple days before and after the trip. I would let them have a little hay in their crates.

    You should also have scrapies papers and you might need a negative TB test to take across state lines from Michigan. Check with your vet or Michigan board of Animal Health. I have been pulled over by a curious trooper (he saw the goats at a fuel stop) and asked for my scrapie id papers.
     
  5. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Our weather is always 'double' hot in August. So you might want to travel at night. Maybe leave there late afternoon.. It will be really hot for them in the back of a pu/with a cab--even with the side windows open. Can you/do you have the 'pass-thru' window on the cab of your truck and the front of the cover?? If so you could open that and let the air flow through... Where are you headed in NC?? Good luck and please give us a report of your trip ... QB
     
  6. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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  7. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I checked... North Carolina requires a TB test & brucellosis test for any goat over 6 mo of age & health certificate for all goats. Animals coming in without these tests can be quarentined and tested at their owners' expense.
     
  8. larellynm

    larellynm Active Member

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    hi

    I just moved from northern minnesota to wisconsin and I just did this 2 weeks ago. I had six goats, 2 babies and 4 adults on a 5 hour trip. I looked all around the net to see if there was anything I could do to help my goats. Didnt find much. So here is what I did.

    I drenched them the day before we moved with goat drench. Then I made sure they had water before they got in the back of the truck. For the bedding in the back I put in a layer of pine shavings and then a layer of hay. Later I found they appeciated this cause it gave them something to do.

    I left them loose inthe back of the truck, it had a topper by the way, there was ventilation but it wasn't breezy.I had heard that too much wind was bad for goats. At first when they got in the confide space I thought they were going to butt each other to death but after the hierarchy got established they settled down and chewed their cud. I also put in some baking soda so if they got tummy aches due to the trip they could help themselves.

    Thankfully we all made it there in one piece and I carefully watched them for signs of illness over the next few days. I hope this helps.

    Larellyn Micheau