Any suggestions for us to take to the architect tonight?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by tinetine'sgoat, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    Goin' to the architect tonight with our proposed plan and was wondering if any of you have suggestions, questions we should ask, thoughts... What are good ways to help conserve money? The proposed plan is for a small 800 square ft house and then a 250 sq foot loft. Full walkout basement that we will finish out later. We are trying to keep bathrooms lined up, to cut down on plumbing cost, and trying to use other cost cutting ideas.
     
  2. beaglady

    beaglady Well-Known Member

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    A good way to conserve money? Don't hire an architect. Seriously, unless you need one for code approval in your municipality, I can't see spending the money. I'd bet they will charge $50 an hour if not more, and planning a house from scratch will take many hours.

    Can you find something close to what you want in one of those books of house plans, and work with a contractor to change it as needed?
     

  3. mamahen

    mamahen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ahhhh....A good friend is planning on building. They are keeping it small also, 2 bedrooms, living, kitchen & dining combined. 1 or 2 baths, and a loft. So far the quotes are upwards of $100,000!!! Unreal!! The Amish quote was $189,000!! :Bawling:
     
  4. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    I would love not to have to get one, but the bank wants prints and since we are building it ourselves I feel more comfortable with prints so we don't goof it up to bad. He isn't to terrible, figures it will be 800-1200 for the final cost, but that is with us takin' in what we want already roughly done and him doing the finish work on them. We also have to have prints for the building permit. Funny how in the old days you could just build a house and noone from the county told you what you had to do. :Bawling:
     
  5. Nessa's Nannies

    Nessa's Nannies Well-Known Member

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    Have you looked into steel buildings? I don't know if they would be convinient in your part of the country but the kit comes with everything including prints, and the price is good.
     
  6. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sometimes you can find an engineer or draftsman to do prints for you and they aren't near as expensive and pompus. I'm not a big fan of most architects. i've bailed them out to many times. if you see anything on your prints that says "xxxxx done by others or general " its becasue he doesn't have a clue. For as small as your house is I would look for and engineer or draftsman. i think one of those software design programs will produce prints for you. the cost of an Architect can be as much as 20% of the building costs
     
  7. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate

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    Have you looked at the houseplans on

    www.countryplans.com? You can purchase their biggest plans for about $200 and with unlimited copying rights for building and there is a forum for asking questions about changing floorplans. They are based on basic measurements of goods bought, ....and they are ready to take to an inspector or builder or bank.

    Angie
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Where are you planning to have the woodstove chimney come thru the roof? My suggestion is to have it come thru at a location near the peak of the roof (not near the sides of the roof). If it comes out near the sides, the chimney will have to be built extremely tall.
     
  9. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    The woodstove will be in the middle of a side wall, and the outside will be the middle of the peak. Do we have to have it so that the vent is so far above the roof line? Are we ahead to take the flue up most of the way on the interior wall, or to take it on outside and run it above the roofline outside. Does that make sense?
     
  10. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    Angie, thanks for the link, I've been lookin' at 'em.

    Tn, where does one go about finding a draftsman?

    Nessa, do you have a good link to those?

    Thank you all!!
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    If at all possible, keep as much of the chimney inside the house as possible. This will result in a warmer flue which will result in less creosote build up.

    On the outside of the house, the chimney has to be at least two feet higher than any part of the house (roof) that is within ten feet. I have seen chimneys that are 10 feet above the part of the roof that they exit to get this clearance. The chimney is so high that it has be braced and cleaned from inside the house!
     
  12. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    Thanks! I was planning on taking it outside to give us more wall decorating space...I know girly junk... but if I'm gonna gain heat (which I hadn't thought of) I'm more than willing to give up wall space. :) Can we run the flue straight (with no elbow) out the roof?
     
  13. paulaswolfpack

    paulaswolfpack Well-Known Member

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  14. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Of course you can, it's preferable to go as straight as possible. The less elbows the better.
     
  15. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    I know you are trying to save $$, but really consider a proper window in your basement - not sure what kind of doors you have - we spent a tiny bit extra and now have a basement with a couple of windows and doors that let in light and it makes a huge difference and of course they can be opened to let air in.

    Also, when making flooring choices make one for one that will last and hold up because it will cost you more to replace it 2nd time around. Have them put in extra outlets in the basement becaue you'll be glad later. We had ours put in the ceiling, so conduit wasn't run across all the walls. We had a heavy duty outlet put in for a second fridge - you may need/want one for a freezer later. Trying to get someone out there later for a small job will be hard.

    Hubby spent lots of time thinking about light switches as our DR, KITCH, LV is open - again something to really think about easy to do while building - horror later. Think about where your couch will go in the LR and any lighting you might need for reading or such as with other rooms. We had extra outlets put in every room. Think about phone lines, computer plugins, cable, etc.

    We also had a sink - cheap kind put in cellar - very handy and again, if the guy is doing the plumbing, it wasn't that much more.

    I'm not trying to make your bill bigger, but really think about these things because as i said it can be such a pain later.

    Good luck!
     
  16. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Look at those houseplan books at the checkout counters. When you order them, you are ordering all the plans that your bank needs (plumbing/wiring, outside, inside, etc..) for a HUGE amount less than an architect will charge you.

    You can find nice books with lots of small houses. Go to lowes or home depot. I think ours cost $600 and we changed a number of things--windows, doors, added a wraparound porch where there wasn't one. Doesn't actually look like the original plans but had the basic layout we wanted.

    As for a list of things:

    -Face the house with as many windows on the south side as you can. This makes a big difference in heating and air bills.

    --Put an overhang so you will not fry with the summer heat but let in a lot of winter sun.

    --If your bath backs to a laundry area, consider a hole in the wall with a door for dropping in laundry.

    --Get front loading washer/dryer and build a plat form for them which will allow you to store stuff.

    ---We keep our house cool, but have heater/fans in the bath so we don't freeze when showering in the am.

    --Consider a built in booth in the kitchen with storage underneath.

    --Consider sunlight so you will need to use lights less.

    --Consider how you will hang up shirts or things that can't be dried in your home (retractable lines?) I have a pole from one side of the laundry room (very small room) to the other to hang shirts.

    --Consider where you can put a foldable ironing board.

    --Consider where you can store winter clothing, hats, dog food, recyclables, dirty boots, etc..

    --We have tall ceilings and I made our cabinets so they didn't go to the ceiling. That way I have tons of room to store large bowls, vases, etc. we only use for company and are decorative.

    --For small spaces, hang as many trays and large serving trays as you can on the walls. It will save a lot of shelf space. Consider those back of the door shelve units that are narrow and hold cans. That saved a lot of space in our last home. That was my pantry!

    Hope that helps.
     
  17. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Probably best way is to look around and ask other people. Sometimes they are in the yellow pages. Sometimes you can find one that moonlights but works in an engineering dept at a court house or factory. if you have codes ask the Building Dept.