Any interest in Northwestern homesteading?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Firethorn, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. Firethorn

    Firethorn Well-Known Member

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    There has been a lot of talk about homesteading communities. We have thought this could be a wonderful opportunity.
    The biggest hurtle for us is that most people want to stay in the south.
    Is there no one that sees the benefit of life in the north? Are there any that feel called to work together with like minded people and drawn to the north?
    How about you that are already in the North? Would you share with us why it is home. Tell us about populous mentality, laws(pertaining to the issues for homesteaders) the availability of livestock, growing seasons and what you go through to produce and what do you produce, the market for home grown, home raised, homemade, and if any would be so inclined to post a picture or two of your place. Oh, and bugs.
    Thanks in advance.
    C.
     
  2. Madame

    Madame Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've decided I want to shoot for northern Michigan - yeah it's cold, but other than mosquitos, bugs aren't bad and oh, it is beautiful. Jobs are scarce, land isn't horribly expensive, and folks are nice. And I'm not too far fromfamily.
     

  3. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    I prefer the north, actually. I was raised in Alaska and on the Oregon Coast (where it seldom gets really hot) and I have serious issues with Southern heat and humidity. Also, I want nutritious forage for my goats, and it seems that dry and north are both beneficial in that respect.

    And, I'm not in any hurry. I'm happy to dialog with the other folks, but I can't go anywhere while my grandmother still needs me, so it may be a few years before I can actually move.

    There is also the issue of the economy: we are on the verge of what could potentially become total melt-down -- it may not get that bad (I hope), but the potential is certainly there. I would rather be snug on my own place when that happens, but at least Grandma's place here is paid for. And in a couple of years, real estate prices may have gone way down (I mean WAY down -- if you plan on selling your place don't wait!). Of course, your dollars may be worth zilch by then, too, so waiting could be a wash.

    The north does have disadvantages, though, depending on altitude and latitude. The growing season can be significantly shorter and the heating season significantly longer -- it will be even more important to find property with firewood on it.

    Kathleen
     
  4. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've lived here in northern Idaho for 4 years on 30 acres on a river, off the grid on solar power. The hardest aspect of living here is the difficulty for most people in finding ways to support themselves. We've lucked out that my husband's business has done so well here. We've found the people to be very nice...friendly but not intrusive. The growing season is of course, shorter than in the south, livestock is easily available. There are 2 farmer's markets close by, and both do very well. Bugs...a fairly short mosquito season, nothing bad, I hate the stink bugs that come out in the fall more. We have no venomous snakes in this area which pleases me after living in the Arizona desert for 9 years. Here is our cabin before we added on to it:
    [​IMG]


    Her's a springtime picture I just took:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    That's beautiful, Lisa!

    Kathleen
     
  6. montanabound

    montanabound Apphorses

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    Hello, we are moving north to Montana on the 8th. It was never a question for me whether it was north or south, I don't tollerate the heat very well (after a heat stroke as a child in Lake Havasau City, AZ). Now, the hubby hails from Blythe, CA and has never seen real mountains or real rivers, he likes OK and TX. My quest to move to Montana has taken 10 years but in my research I found that a more simple, humble life is what I was searching for.
    As for different weather and ways of gardening, I think that is everywhere you go. Now here where we live in AZ right now, it would take me bringing in (or making it) compost, soil, all sorts of stuff just to garden, and that's just for the ground, we also have the dry, burn your skin off wind, the sun, dry, dry, dry...the list goes on. So, I think wherever you go it takes some adjustments.
    I say follow your dreams because the time may come and go and you will always wonder.

    Lisa, what a beautiful piece of property and house you have, almost too pretty to be real:O)

    Loree in AZ
     
  7. jerneeon

    jerneeon Well-Known Member

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    I live in Washington and love the northwest. I'd probably head to Montana or Idaho if I had a choice, but right now, I don't. However, anywhere in the northwest really is better than the humid south.
     
  8. Firethorn

    Firethorn Well-Known Member

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    Oh, I am so glad to here you all say so! I was beginning to think that we were the only ones.