Any Ideas??????????

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by daytrader, Jun 30, 2006.

  1. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    We got 10 ewes and 1 ram in two nights ago. They were in a holding pen.

    We are not liked much here. The animals were let out of a pad locked holding pen with a cut pad lock.

    We spend a good 6 hours trying to catch the animals. Its was the hardest thing I had ever had to do. Realy it was. I also live next to a very busy road. The critters took off to the neibors BROKE DOWN what little barb wire fence they had and set up residence.

    The ram was off. We had a hold of him, BUT DO TO A NO ROPE POLICY were not able to hold him. He knocked down and injured a man. Sending him to the hospital.

    We searched yesterday and today for the ram. No luck. We are marking him as lost.

    We have a general area he was last seen. 20+ folks have looked for him. Covering hundreds of acrea and some DAMN hard to pass woods. Coon dogs could not even cover the woods. We did it. NO DANG RAM!

    We trailered two goats and 3 ewes. Letting them make there calls hopeing this would bring him out. Nothing at all.

    I walked the woods today with two goats that follow me and herd pretty well. They enjoyed the woods. Making their calls offten. Nothing. I will say one thing. Goats are real kin. These poor goats busted their buts and I had to cut the cuts zo vine off them many times.

    Anyone one have any ideas? AND NO SHACKING A CAN OF FEED DOSE NOT WORK. That only sends three large belgin horses after you. I also learned horses HATE sheep. I never knew this. :shrug:
     
  2. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    What would you do, anyway, if you saw the ram? Shoot him? Maybe he'll come back, when the ewes are in heat.

    Be sure to let the police se the cut lock...that might help with the insurance, for the man that is in hospital.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You could bring the ewes into heat with PMSG and estrogen shots. You'd need to get both through a vet with instructions. I'd take my own photos of cut locks etc, but yes do phone the police to get thier report! Sounds like you are doing your best to find the ram, if grain won't get him out you're left with legging it through the woods as you're doing I'd say. BTW only some horses hate sheep, mine get along with and even protect them.
     
  4. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    Oh, you have my sympathy!

    I spent some time earlier this week out hunting for my two escaped sheep. Finally found them, one dead and one okay ... it's exhausting, physically and emotionally.

    I wonder if it's possible to tether a very tolerant ewe in a pen with an open gate. If Mr Ram comes home, you can shut him in. The ewes might have to take turns, of course, being tethered can't be much fun.
     
  5. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    No rope policy? I'm confused...

    Yes, you can tether a ewe in the holding pen. Not sure how you'll do it without a rope :shrug: Also, you'll want to be sure you're around so she doesn't get tangled, bitten by a dog, or turned loose.

    Certainly report to the police what has happened.
     
  6. eieiomom

    eieiomom Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear about your sheep.

    There is a guy out east that has been trying to catch his runaway sheep and you can access his posts at this link :http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SheepOnTheNet/msearch?query=runaway+sheep&charset=windows-1252

    There may be some ideas that others have recommended or he has tried that may be of help to you.

    Our horses got along great with our sheep. When we brought in a colored ram after having only white ewes, it took some getting used to by our gelding, but it wasn't too bad.

    Hope things work out for you.
     
  7. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When we got our first three sheep, Black Welsh Mountain ewes, they got out and it was the devil trying to get them back in. My border collie was just a pup and not worth much. Those ewes plotted. They conspired, but I did learn how to apply pressure and to give them more credit in the brain department. I have ten adults and five lambs now, and with the dog I can get them back in when they get out, as well as move them in the open. My collie is worth is weight in gold.

    As soon as you can, get the ewes eating a little nibble out of your hand every morning, and associated with the sound of oats in a bucket. I also suggest you find a shearer to teach you how to grab a sheep and roll him on his butt.

    Sheep do not like being alone, and I think as soon as your ram can figure out where the girls are, he will return, if he is able.
     
  8. ErinC

    ErinC Well-Known Member

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    Try putting a few hog panels (or fencing - I just adore hog panels though) and pen the girls into half of the pasture, leave the gate open. This always works for me. If you can get those ewes into heat, he will come back even if he's 99% dead, yay hormones. Definitely learn how to roll a sheep onto his rear if you don't already, it will save a ton of blood, sweat and tears.
     
  9. Muskrat

    Muskrat Well-Known Member

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    Sheep are flock animals. Assuming he is not seriously injured, the ram is looking for a flock even as we speak. Sheep have an excellent sense of smell and he may well backtrack to the others. He may also join some other group, sheep, goats, even cattle, so it would be well to spread the word that you're looking for a missing ram.

    It sounds as if you need some guidance in handling sheep. Perhaps asking the person who sold them to you will be of help. Chasing a ram in hot weather is a good recipe for heatstroke, both for you and the animal. A single canny dog is worth a half-dozen humans in a break-out.

    It seems you have some issues with neighbors. Animals are ready targets for animosity. It can be difficult to protect them. Good luck.
     
  10. Terry W

    Terry W Duchess of Cynicism

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    Boy, is THAT ever an understatement!!!

    I think maybe Daytrader needs to invest in a couple LGDs that can be very effective against two legged predators, as well.
     
  11. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    You mark the ram as lost in action. There are foxes and coyotes around here. Things have settled down.

    The sheep have become more freindly to us. Still will not let you touch them, but they follow us around and the goats seem to lead them. The fellow that bred these sheep for us has been a great help. He is also going to help us ram and helpped with the lay out, fencing, and pasture types along with planted padocks of our farm lay out for the sheep.

    He showed the wife the roll deal. I have not had the time to put into this yet. I will.

    We do need a good sheep dog. Just waiting a sec before we jump into that. We love dogs and have english bull dogs that are pets. A sheep dog would have to be a working dog for us. We would also have to find a way to house him the best we can for his wellbeing and use. Being In town and out of town we have both city property and agriculture land allowing the dog to run free is almost imposible UNLESS he will stay in the fenced in area. This is a area we are researching yet.

    A new ram is being bred and will be available for a December Breeding I am told As long as a quality member is come apon.

    The sheep are doing really well. They are on pasture and seem to like it alot. I will cut the pature they are on tomarrow as I am told it is to high for them. I have been told to maintain the pasture to 6" for their best use. I figured more is better. I guess I was wrong.

    We have one of those sheep mineral and vitamine blocks out for them. We also give them "sheep/goat" feed once a week as a treat.

    We always fed the goats horse feed. I have been told more then once that sheep are not like goats. The sheep can not handle the copper in horse feed? So I paid for the sheep feed that the farm store had to order. I had them order me 1000 pounds. It was alot cheaper that way. I put it up incase of a winter emergancy and figure once breed this would be a good staple feed?

    The wife would like a Llama as a guard animal. I would like a dog that was a herding and guard dog. I guess both are in store.
     
  12. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A llama is a good guard animal against dogs, but a dog is a better deterent against people.

    I feed sheep grassy hay in the winter, and a little oats. Very little oats. They also get sheep salt/minerals, but don't eat it much in the winter. Have never fed commercial feed so I can't comment. Are you set up to rotate the grazing?
     
  13. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I am set up to rotate. Right now its not fully operational due to only having 10 sheep and two goats.