any ideas for converting to rotational grazing?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by godsgapeach, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. ycanchu2

    ycanchu2 Well-Known Member

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    I recently got another batwing bushhog with dual wheels in the centersection, between them and the tractor tires, they smash about 90% of the manure piles. Will that suffice in lieu of dragging? Anyone doing that or dragging something behind the bushhog to make one trip?
     
  2. Gravytrain

    Gravytrain Well-Known Member

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    You could pull a drag harrow/chain harrow behind it. I pull an 8' one behind a brush hog or by itself behind an atv.
     

  3. ycanchu2

    ycanchu2 Well-Known Member

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    In clipping the fescue, this time of year fescue will head out before you can get thru the rotation. is everyone clipping strictly behind the cattle? or also going in front of the cattle and removing the seedheads?
     
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  4. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf Well-Known Member

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    I love that QUESTION ycanchu2 --ive been trying to think of how to word it myself ,because if I go hit the seedheads right as their forming im guessing the seeds wouldn't form & become viable seeds to help keep the field planted well or fully whatever -----and im wondering if I wait till the day before cows get to the area --if the seeds would be toxic enuff that the following chickens would get effected from eating the seeds laying around ??? or for that matter eat all the seeds that fall & therefore not effectively replanting any seeds into the ground from cattle traffic ????
     
  5. collegeboundgal

    collegeboundgal -Melissa

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    Well, what I've been doing is clipping everything but at different heights. The fields that the cows just came off of get clipped from 4 or 5 inches. The fields the cows will be moving to SOON don't get clipped till after the cows move through them as it takes me many days to clip everything and with the storms and wrk and no one to watch the kids, it can take over a week or 2 to get everything clipped. So I start clipping in fields where the cows won't be for 2-3 weeks and clip higher at 12 inches or more. The longer before cows will be in a field, the shorter I clip. Then I just wrk my way to right behind the cows. As they are moved out, I will clip right behind them if that field hasn't been clipped yet.
     
  6. ufo_chris

    ufo_chris Well-Known Member

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    I have a pasture that I don't need right now and want to get it ready for winter stockpiling. I will be brush hogging it periodically but my question is how often and how short should I do it since there will be no cattle on it till winter?
    Since there are no cattle on it right now would it be more beneficial to clip it real short? I've just noticed before when we've cut a piece of field for a lawn area it came in real nice if you mow it short like a lawn.
    And I guess this way I would have to do it less often? I normally clip behind the cows but not real short.
    I'm in northeastern Ohio in the pasture is mixed I don't really know my grasses but it has some clover in it also.
    I have been using it for around 5 years with the Agmantoo rotational grazing and they did really well on it.
    I've just always had more cattle till now and couldn't set anything aside or go into winter too long.
     
  7. ycanchu2

    ycanchu2 Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't go real short....too short causes the grass to use its root reserves to grow back. ....so your not gaining much. When you see the grass grow up and start drooping over then its starting to slow down. Clip the blades to no more than half at that point. That will stimulate it to start growing again.
    In many ways its similar to a yard, just taller.
     
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  8. ufo_chris

    ufo_chris Well-Known Member

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    Thanks ycanchu2, I didn't think I could but I thought it's worth asking would be less work and resources.
    Also,when should I cut it for the last time bf winter , I'm thinking maybe end of August if it's not real dry , that way it still has all of September at least to come back?
    We usually get frosts in October.
    Oh ,and how long can I let it get between clippings?
    I'm thinking it's probably good to let the grasses go to seed once or twice but then the weeds will also LOL
     
  9. ycanchu2

    ycanchu2 Well-Known Member

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    When should you stop clipping? Don'y know,but probably later than you think. I would think into Sept., Oct., for your area. Just remember, when the blades droop over, it is starting to slow down. That's when it needs to be clipped in order to stimulate more growth. It could be 2 or 3 weeks maybe longer in between clippings.
     
  10. ufo_chris

    ufo_chris Well-Known Member

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    Thanks!
    I figured it's not going to grow much in October, gets pretty cool,and a few frosts,that's why I was thinking end of August let it grow Sept bc it's usually kinda dry by then also.
    But I will watch the weather and see what the forecast is around that time and I guess decide then when to clip it the last time.
    I will watch for the drooping, I did not know about that, thank you !
     
  11. ycanchu2

    ycanchu2 Well-Known Member

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    I certainly don't know it all, but I don't think you can clip fescue too much as long as its not cut too short or bone dry. You could take a small section and mow it late into the fall and see if there is any difference......like next year. Grass will atrophy just like an unexcercised muscle. I let some stand last year all year untouched and this year it is my poorest pasture.
     
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  12. ferdberfel

    ferdberfel New Member

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    Agman, if you are still around. I have read up to page 86 over a period of months. You may have already told us, if so I apologize for asking again. How short do you let the cattle graze the grass during the growing season?
    I am about 2/3 of the way south in Illinois and the grass totally quits growing in the winter. How short would you let them graze then?
     
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  13. ycanchu2

    ycanchu2 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not Agman.....but I will give my two cents. The shorter you graze a grass the longer it takes to recover....anytime of the year. The exception to that would be crabgrass. Crabgrass is real good, but if your whole farm is in it you won't have any winter grazing since it dies with a hard freeze.
    If you have a lot of fescue...cattle tend to not graze it too short in the summer unless forced to, since its not very palatable in the summer. When it starts frosting on it, it starts getting sweeter and they really like it. Grazing fescue short in the winter doesn't seem to be an issue.
     
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