Any hints on which best tools to aquire for taking down a building?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moonwolf, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I'm looking at possibly dismantling an upper level of a house that only the roof burned basically. Most of the framing lumber and cedar siding is intact and usable on about 4/5 of the structure. Getting down to the first level to possibly replace the roof by a builder.

    What best affordable tools to get that are most helpful to take framing apart to make studs and other boards usable again? Reciprocating saw is on the list.
    Any other hints that might be helpful in particular tools for the job?, like better nail pullers, crow bars, etc.???
     
  2. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...................Sawzall , crowbar , Dynoooooomite , (1) unemployed Sumo wrestler :help: who speaks some english and a Gisha girl :clap: to serve Sushi and saki for lunch .fordy.. :)
     

  3. boxwoods

    boxwoods Well-Known Member

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    flat shovel to take the siding off, nice and easy
    might as well scrap the plywood
    use sawzall on all the studs
    plenty of metal blades
    sledge
     
  4. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    include a cats paw and flat bar along with the patience not to jsut destroy everything while taking it apart! Take it apart carefully and you can salvage alot of the material. However, there is the difficulty in working with age hardened material and while it can be done new lumber would be my choice if I could afford it....and use the salvage for outbuildings.

    When I worked commercial construction we would get to a point in a major remodel that had a opportunity for a good salvage operation. The 'boss' would have had us use the wrecking bars to rip. tear, and break apart the structure to get the job done in short order....I always offered to do the demolition on my own time in with little effort I could take whatever it was apart and use it for my own use...and not settle for making kindling. All my outbuildings are built from lumber I salvaged in this way......use care and forethought and you'll have no problems....
     
  5. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    you are best off moving as large as piece as you can. with ross's house they cut off the roof and 3/4 of the wall and moved this seperatly. joined wall together with short 2x4 and lag bolts. might be worth while pricing a pro move.
    still sawzall ,wrecking bar , and a hydraulic jack as well as a good framing hammer go a long way!
     
  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Dust mask, eye protection, steel soled and toed boots, gloves, hard hat,.......... a cordless screwdriver might help you salvage doors and electrical fixtrues though I prefer new electrics myself
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I hadn't thought of that idea. Might be a possible option? If I talk with the builder very soon, I may just bring that up. thanks.
     
  8. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Two pound sledge.
    Full size sledge.
    A Milwaukee sawsall with bi-metal blades.
    Four sizes of crow bars.
    A flat shovel or pitch fork for removing shingles.
    Circlular saw.
    Hydraulic jack.
    A large 24 ounce Estwing hammer. You will appreciate this size when you get into the work.
    Carpenters nips for cutting nails.
    Maybe a hack saw for cutting plumbing.
    Pair of Klien side cuts, which you will use more than you would imagine.
    Most importantly, buy the nicest quality tools you can afford. Quality stuff does cost more, but well worth the money in time and work saved, in durability of the tool, are often designed for very rugged wear and for the work you are using them for, and will last you a life time if you don't lose them.
    clove
    clove
     
  9. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    A couple of good crowbars. A blue bar or two. A couple of sledgehammers of various weights. I've got a hooligan tool which is great for demolition. Gotta have a sawzall. A chainsaw can come in handy too.

    Something else important is a hardhat and eye protection along with sturdy gloves and boots. I've torn down several houses and it can be very dangerous if you aren't careful.