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Discussion Starter #1
Would love to connect with other Haflinger people. One of my horses is half Haflinger and half Quarter horse. We're actually hoping to add a full Haflinger to our farm! Would love to hear about other's experiences and knowledge of this breed.
 

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I had a warm blood cross. He was Haflinger/thoroughbred. He was an easy going animal with the best temperament of any of the horses I ever had.

But he was tall, really tall. His back came to the top of my head and I'm 5'4". It took me using a bucket to stand on to give him a good brush.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's awesome! Mine is only 14.3h which is good because I am only 5'! My horse also has an amazing temperament and so intelligent! He's also a bit of a mischief too! He is 30 years old now and I have had him since he was a 2 yr old. I'm looking for a full Haflinger!
 

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We almost bought my daughter a Haflinger but when we brought them to her lesson to try they were unhinged. Not at all like the old style haflinger temperament. They were very hot, and she was only nine...though a good little equestrian. We ended up with a mustang pony for her and a POA and eventually she got a beautiful Oldenburg cross from a lady here on HT who also had a haflinger.

@SFM in KY
 

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Don't blame you. I was able to interact with some Haflingers at dressage shows, I don't know if it's possible but they were even more laid back than my Max.

When I would ride Max, I'd drop the stirrup all the way down, get in the saddle and raise it to where I needed it. But at 5 feet I'm not sure even that would work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Most of the ones we've been around are exceptionally sweet but I suppose like any breed there are exceptions. I definitely hope to find a laid back one!
 

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i'v had two and found both a good size to pull my little cart around .nice friendly horses that did'nt eat me out of house n home and easy keepers i lost one when he got hit by lightning , then a mare i bought from a horse trader was super laid back , i went to feed one morning and found a new baby colt ; both were easy to handle and steady under harness but i just drove around the farm in a stone boat sled or buggy ,draggind in poles or fence post some times .still wish i had another
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's a shame the Morgans changed so much. When I was a kid I had a little Morgan mare, the old style. She was a wonderful little horse! I wonder if the hot haffies are the ones bred for show? I sure hope I can find the older style and good temperament.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Basically they used to be small, very strong, with fabulous temperaments. I only know that back in the 90s you could hardly find one from the old original breeding. What I was seeing were long legged tall horses with much less stocky structure. If someone hadn't told me they were Morgans I would have thought they were Saddlebreds, or something similar. It's still hard to find the old Morgan. I hope the Haflingers don't change too much!
 

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I don't consider what you're seeing now a Morgan. Your physical description of them is what a Morgan is.

The only way to protect the breeds as we know them is to breed them ourselves. Well, not me since I don't have horses anymore.

I never found the physical appearance of Saddlebreds very appealing.
 

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Yes, what MLF said. There are the old foundation type Morgan’s and then the lines that were heavily infused with Saddlebred. You go to a Saddleseat show (only because some friends dragged me) and you’re hard out to see the difference between the Morgans and Saddlebreds in their English Pleasure classes. Pretty sad.
pretty sad what they’ve done to Saddlebreds and Arabians though too.
 

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I don't consider what you're seeing now a Morgan. Your physical description of them is what a Morgan is.

The only way to protect the breeds as we know them is to breed them ourselves. Well, not me since I don't have horses anymore.

I never found the physical appearance of Saddlebreds very appealing.
There are folks out there breeding foundation lines. We used to have one here. To be registered as a foundation Morgan they have culled out the Saddlebred lines that were added since the 30’s I think.

My first horse was an unregistered foundation type Morgan from Vermont back in the 80’s.
Only 15 hands which was small for a 5’8 and a half person doing hunters and dressage on him. But he had endless heart and when we foxhunted, I’d get offers to buy him. I miss him.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I agree with everyone! The only thing I worry about with a haflinger is whether the horse will be too wide! As small as I am too wide is an issue sometimes! I will have to try each one I look at for sure!
 
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