Any grass experts?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by furholler, May 21, 2006.

  1. furholler

    furholler Cedar Cove Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    1,706
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Location:
    MO
    Does anyone know anthing about Little Blue Stem? Specifically, can it be grazed until it disappears? Any help would be great. Thanks.
     
  2. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,649
    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    Hill Country, Texas
    Little bluestem is a native bunch grass. My cows like it just fine, so do my sheep. Why do you want it to disappear?? Round Up will kill it.
     

  3. furholler

    furholler Cedar Cove Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    1,706
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Location:
    MO
    I don't want it to disappear, my animals like it as well. I read somewhere that Little Blue Stem will disappear if it is hayed in consecutive years. Although I am not making hay with it, I am concerned that my animals could eat it enough to keep it from going to seed and, therefore, stop it from growing altogether. Should I just not worry about it?
     
  4. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    You could rotate it some, allow it to seed. Generally plants are on a mission to reproduce. They grow a lot when they first start growing at the beginning of the season. If you cut off grass/hay early, before it heads. It will attempt to head out at a shorter stage. Say it heads with a total height of 3-4' (Going with orchard grass here), but you cut it before it even got above 2'. It could try to head with 2nd cutting. I have seen this before, not ane entire field, but it can happen.


    Since little blue stem is a plant, that does try to reseed itself, the same effect could be reached. Simply let it grow for a few weeks ungrazed, it should try to reseed itself. But don't wait forever, or it will get too late. Remember, most hay fields, especially alfalfa is harvested before it flowers out, and before it goes to seed. It does have a life, and will die out over time. Alfalfa can come back if it is let go to seed. So it more or less is a management prefrence. If you want it in your pasture, let it seed, while you graze another half. The following year, do the same. Should keep it healthy.


    Jeff
     
  5. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

    Messages:
    8,818
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Location:
    S.E.Alabama
    Dont over graze, it like anyother grass can be grazed down to the dirt and killed off by over grazeing, let it stay at a healthy hight and it will maintain and if you let it go to seed now and then it will be able to reproduce both via seed and by sending off runner/rizomes (cant remimber wich variety it is) to make new plants next to the original, but it wont spread fast.

    my Native Land (kansas) has lots of prairie land full of it, its an excelent pasture along with the other native grasses, just graze your land responcibly and you will be fine
     
  6. furholler

    furholler Cedar Cove Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    1,706
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Location:
    MO
    Thanks for all the advice. I am going to start with letting one paddock go to seed and rotate from there. Maybe 1 paddock per year?