Any good sites about installing and using hand pumps?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Hears The Water, Jan 13, 2007.

  1. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a friend who has two wells on his place. One is the old one his grandpa used to use and is 90 ft deep. It was and still in a bucket and rope operation and he thinks it has about 1-2 ft of silt at the bottom of it. It is covered by a well house. The other one is a drilled well that is 300 ft deep and is the one he is using. We where talking about having a hand pump put by just in case something ever happend and he would still have water, but he commented that the 300 ft well was just too deep for a hand pump. I don't know, so I thought I would ask y'all what you think. I would love to be able to pass along any sites that talk about this. He mentioned that it would probably just be easier to get a mud bucket and clean out the 90 ft well and then have the water tested and if it is good, to set up a hand pump there. I went to Lehmans to poke around and I think I underdtand the basics of how a hand pump works... but isn't 90' a little shallow for a good long lasting well? I am asking y'all because I don't know anything about this subject and would like to learn. Thanks in advance for your help.
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    How far below the ground surface is the water level in each well? If it is less than 25 feet, a pitcher pump can be used. If it is more than 25 feet, a deep well hand pump must be used.
     

  3. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So what CF is saying is that it does not matter as much how deep the well is as apposed to where the top of the water is in relation to the pump? Am I understading you correctly? So if my understanding is correct a 90' well with water 75 feet down would use a different type of pump than a 300' well with water 10 from the surface...yes? Thanks for my first lesson!
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  4. jukebox

    jukebox Well-Known Member

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  5. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow! I actually understood a lot of that! It appears that one could install one of these to your existing well to fill your existing pressure tank for a tad over $1000. Not bad! I am not sure how much a pump installer would charge to put one of these puppies in... but it would so be worth it if the power was out for a long period of time...like a SHTF situation or a power outage from natural disasters. This friend is in the midwest like I am and in fact lives near a town that was very much torn up by a tornado a few years ago. So a good hand pump would be a wise investment in my opinion. Thanks for that link. Do you have personal experice with this product by chance? Anyone else?
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  6. hoofinitnorth

    hoofinitnorth Well-Known Member

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    The term for the water level is "static water level". It describes where the water will sit if not pumped. When they test the well refresh rate, they test how far this level drops when it's being pumped at a defined rate over a certain period of time.
     
  7. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    A 90' well might be just as good or better than the 300' one. My well is only 48' deep, with water about 10' down. It's an old hand dug well that's been here for over 60 years and has never gone totally dry. It does pump out every now and then and we have to wait a few minutes for it to refill, but even in bad drought conditions, it always refills and has never gone dry. Now some of my neighbors who have wells anywhere from 130' to 600' have lost water during drought conditions. In the past they've come to my house to fill containers. Weird, but true. I guess they must have drilled into a pocket and mine must be fed by an underground river. Something keeps my water running when others dry up??? Also, their wells have sulfur water and mine doesn't.
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Hey, when you're using a hand pump to obtain water, a well's recharge rate is 99% of the time a non-issue....at least in my experience. You just can't pump water fast enough by hand to actually "dry up" your well....even temporarily
     
  9. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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  10. hoofinitnorth

    hoofinitnorth Well-Known Member

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    Cabin Fever - around here there are many wells that don't produce even a gallon per minute so depending on the static level of the water vs. the depth of the well (how much you have to pump out to catch up to the well's current production), you can and sometimes do "dry up" the well. You just hope and pray it's temporary! :)