antique stove

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by okgoatgal2, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    ok, i have a chance to buy an antique stove. it is a prosperity, sold by sears, roebuck & co. it is green and cream colored, a couple of knobs are broken and there is a note on it that it does work. is 100$ a good price on this stove?
     
  2. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What kind of stove? Are the grates and firebox in good shape, no cracks or rust holes in the body?

    Jim
     

  3. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    Is this a kitchen gas ??..wood..coal ..?? or a "wood heater" type of stove.
     
  4. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    it is a kitchen gas stove, no noticeable cracks or damage other than a couple of wear spots on the enamel. did not open to look at the burner grates, it was covered with nicknacks. doors and drawers (2 of them) worked fine, other than the missing knobs.
     
  5. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    IT is a very good buy, if it doesn't have a lot of rust.
     
  6. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    I happen to be using now for many years an older type of kitchen stove also. It is an "Eriez" model but have never heard of it before. I purschased mine for $90. It is the type that stands on 4 legs and the 4 burners are on the side with the oven next to it. you need to light it with a match and the degrees are off by about 50 or so...but you learn to work with that. Not really much can go wrong with them but to have someone fix the thermostat is an expensive deal. Look on www.antiquestoves.com and see what they have on there.. very nice but very expensive !! Good Luck with your new find !!
     
  7. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    Depending on your gas supply and the gas it is made to burn now, it may need to be modified to burn decently. Old burners won't always work good with modern gas. Orifices, etc., may be too small/large/etc. to let it burn well. See how it burns and if it is too bad, have someone real knowledgable with stove burners get it working right for you. Holes may need to be either enlarged or shrunken.
     
  8. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The orifices etc can also wear/enlarge over the years (we had a nice gas stove that my folks bought in 1950 that we finally got rid of because the orifices or jets had worn or corroded over the years, valves leaked a bit, etc). I would want to make sure that the stove actually worked before buying it.

    Jim
     
  9. ci-stovenut

    ci-stovenut New Member

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    By all means! $100 is an excellent price to buy the stove,especially if its from the 1920s-1940s era. Parts are still available for the stoves as well from various sources on the web such as Macy's Classic Stove Works. There is also a group site/discussion at Yahoo on antique and vintage stoves,it has an informative Links page where you dont have to spend hours surfing the web,if your interested the web address is: http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/castironstoveenthusiast :angel: