anti-bark collars

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Cygnet, Dec 31, 2004.

  1. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Has anyone ever used one of the anti-barking collars?

    My new pup -- eight month old aussie/cattle dog cross -- barks, howls, whines, and generally throws a fit all night. She hates being crated, but I've learned the hard way that this is a dog who MUST be confined when not supervised. She's gone over the fence outside, and inside, the moment I take my eyes off her, she's chewing things that are dangerous to her like bottles of medication, electric cords, windex, etc ... she's eaten two purses of mine, and ate the pillow on my bed next to me while I was sleeping. (Feathers everywhere.)

    Need to deal with the barking/screaming/howling/whining NOW as she's annoying the hell out of me and I can only imagine what the neighbors think. Think nonstop screaming fits where she sounds like she's being tortured -- the first time she threw a fit, I ran in to check on her in the crate thinking she'd gotten hung up and was screaming in pain.

    Normally, I'd deal with the barking with behavior modification but this needs to be deal with immediately for my sanity and peace with the neighbors. (The chewing will resolve itself when she's older I think.)

    How well to the anti-bark collars actually work and do they also work on howling/whining/yelping?

    (Incidently, she's not barking AT anything, if she's barking outside, she's just standing in the middle of the yard barking. It's very irritating.)

    Leva
     
  2. Yankee1

    Yankee1 Well-Known Member

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    I used one on a pup 2 years ago and it worked like magic.
    within a week she no longer barked randomly and is the same today. She will anly bark at something.
     

  3. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Act like you're gonna kill her when she cries and throw shoes..whatever it takes. She WILL stop. I've not used the anti bark collars in crates only if they harrass cattle while hog hunting...I mean technically they're electronic collars..not anti bark collars but close enough. I'm deaf so I'm no help here :rolleyes: Let me know how it goes.

    Ted
     
  4. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    There is a reason your dog does this. Usually it is a lack of serious work and exersize(mental and physical!), absolute boredom and/or anxiety. I have never seen a dog that barked, howled etc all night that wasn't cured by a lot of challenging work and training and attention along with positive reinforcement. You have a high energy, high focus dog.

    Everyone has a different set-up I know and no one has a crystal ball where we can see your set up and what you do with the dog. But getting to the purpose of what is happening is a far better way to go than just correcting the symptoms.

    Good luck, hope all goes well. LQ
     
  5. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I come from a family of dogtrainers -- my grandparents were both akc judges and had goldens they both showed and used for hunting. I agree 100% with what you said -- I'm thinking with this little girl, I may get her into agility and/or herding. I'm a pretty good judge of dogs, and this one's something special -- she's got the right kind of temperment to go a long, long way in obediance. She's a mutt, but I know you can compete mutts in agility, so I may go that way with her. :)

    And I know exactly why she's throwing fits. It's seperation anxiety. She's a rescue whose owners gave her up -- never abused, and she was bottle fed by the family that gave her to me, but they couldn't keep her ... so she's effectively lost her "mommies" and her family all in one fell swoop. Time will take care of it, but in the meantime, she's becoming an incredible nuisance with the noise, and my neighbors are pretty tolerant but there are limits!!!!!

    If she were not such a chewing fiend, I'd let her sleep with me, but right now, it's no safe to leave her unsupervised (even if I'm asleep in the same room).

    *shrug* Eventually, she's going to be a hell of a dog. She's just a pup who's had a rough time recently ...

    Leva

     
  6. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Forget about the dogs's emotions, they are the dog's problem not yours.

    Slap the bark collar (only the shock ones work) on the dog and leave it there for a couple of weeks. Problem solved.

    Barking as discribed is bad behaviour. I don't care what the reason is for it, the behaviour must stop. A shock collar will achieve this goal.

    Pete
     
  7. kjerckie

    kjerckie Well-Known Member

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    Sure, used one on a redboned coonhound. He was smarter. The device gave a 3 second warning chirp. Coonhound would bay loudly till it chirped, be silent til it 'reset', then bay again. Had to admire him. I ended up giving him away to someone with another lonely coonhound.
     
  8. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does she have a chew toy in the crate? Is the crate in the room with you? Do you take her for a long hard run every day?

    There is an anti bark collar that sprays the dog's face with citrenella or something. I've heard that they work with a dog that occassionally barks, but real barkers often react to the spray by barking and you just have a little crisis on your hands.

    One method to deal with barkers (and if there are dog trainers in your family perhaps they've used this) is to teach the dog to bark on cue: encourage him to bark on cue, treat. Once he has this down, tell him "speak" he barks, "speak" he barks, "hush" you put treat in front of his nose. He can't bark and sniff at the same time. Reward for hush. If you can break his habit with "hush" and a treat, I think he will break the reward pattern (barking releases endorphins so it is it's own reward).
     
  9. John Carter

    John Carter Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, bet that heading got yer attention.
    Ive used the collar on a Lab, effectivley
    also a female mutt heinze 57 type. also worked
    Conned my big mouthed teenage daughter oncet to try it, and it really got her attention too
    :cool:
     
  10. Madame

    Madame Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have you considered putting the crate in your bedroom? When I foster dogs, I usually crate them at night. I put them in my room so they know there's someone around. I also give them a bone or treat when I put them in the crate so as to create positive associations. Seems to me that a shock collar should be the absolute last resort.
     
  11. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    I don't think they need a reason to bark, barking is fun rather they need a reason NOT to bark. I love the Ecollars, they save time, nerves and vocal cords.

    I have 11 blue heelers at the moment, at ages from about 4 years old to 15 weeks old.

    Once they learn quiet makes me happier than barking, they hush just fine.

    Anyone want to buy a puppy? It will know how to shut up along, with the other basic comands.
     
  12. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

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    I finally had to get one for my 12 year old Collie a couple of years back. He was a very smart, active, well-trained (albeit stubborn!!) dog, but very vocal if alone for any length of time. It had finally gotten to the point of either a collar, giving him away, or putting him down...I was tired of having my life dictated by co-dependant dog!! (btw, never get a dog from someone in it only to supply pet stores! :no: )

    I tried it on myself first...I wanted to know what I'd be putting him through. I coughed loudly with it on, and the shock felt like a long, drawn out static shock, only less "sharp". It was set up so that he was allowed one "warning" bark, but would shock him if he kept barking. Worked wonderfully! It's not painful enough to act as a deterent if there is something that has legitimately grabbed his attention, (in this situation, he has actually figured out to space out his barks to avoid the shock) but it does keep him from barking eveytime I'd go out the front door, or when he gets worked up in general. I also noticed that he seemed to calm down a lot as his "tantrum barking" stopped.

    I do not keep the collar on at all times. I put it on him if I know that he will be in a situation that gets him overly excited, or if he starts falling back into bad habits again. The collar generally stays on for no more that a couple of days at a time. I've found that sometimes, the best way to teach a dog is by allowing him to teach himself. He quickly learned that he was controlling that big mosquito on his neck, and the rest was history!
     
  13. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    We used one on a labrador retriever. Best darn hunting dog...but he loved to bark...mostly at night! We have a local store that rents these training collars...so we rented the best one..also included a "dummy" collar to use occasionally....and supposedly the dog wouldn't know the difference. Ha! This dog knew...wouldn't bark with the "real" collar....but when we took it off and replaced with the "dummy"....he barked. We had to leave the shock collar on him....until he figured out how to get that collar off....found it chewed up in his pen one morning! So we went to using a BB Gun....found that the distance from our back door to his pen was just enough to sting his behind....and he couldn't figure out why! :eek: Eventually he quit the constant barking and became a fine companion.
     
  14. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    When we first got our Aussie pup she cried all night. After that we put her in the crate by our bed and put a nice fuzzy blanket down. Gave her a dog bone to chew on also. Make sure you have lots of jobs for her to do during the day to tire her out. Also is she getting enough to eat during the day? We had to go back to feeding 3 times a day for awhile as she wasn't growing like we wanted. Supplemented her puppy kibble with a little goats milk. Plenty of treats during the day with lots of baby talk and praise. She now sleeps through the night at 4 months old.
     
  15. Bob_W_in_NM

    Bob_W_in_NM Well-Known Member

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    Will one of these collars stifle a nagging wife or girl friend? :haha:
     
  16. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Howdy
    A citronella collar shut my barker right down. The manufacturers claim citronella collars have a higher rate of success than shock collars as well as being more humane. It certainly worked for me. My rescue yelper screamed his head off when I tried crating him his first days here - came very close to taking him back - but with the collar he chilled out. Now it is his chosen place to sleep every night and the collar is packed away in a drawer. Got mine from Petsmart online. Goodluck. :)
     
  17. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

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    I used one on my Black Lab.

    Apparently he never figured out what was giving him the shock, because all we would hear was "Bark yelp....bark yelp....bark yelp....bark yelp.........etc"
     
  18. Litsa

    Litsa Member

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    Cruel and unusual punishment that I've never really understood. I suppose if you keep dogs like you keep cattle then any measure will do. But, if your dog is a companion (pet) then the idea of an anti-barking collar is almost sick. If they were human you'd be put in jail for such crime. Another thing I've never understood - when your granny is sick and ailing, euthanasia is considered immoral, but when your dog is sick and ailing, you are considered immoral if you don't put them down. If it was me, I'd learn to live and love the dog, as he is, including the wise suggestions others have offered. Otherwise, put him down, there's lots of dogs in the world. Why seek answers from technology in this case and seek to be relieved of technology in so many others?
     
  19. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, whatever.

    Here's a link to the collar that worked for me:

    Citronella Collar
     
  20. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    No...collar is too large. It is best suited for a husband or boyfriend...sure makes them sit up and listen to what you say..every gal should keep one handy :D