Another Question - Yellow edges on Leaves

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by kitaye, May 29, 2006.

  1. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    Canada - Zone 5
    We finally managed to get the last of the plants in the garden and with the exception of 3 weeks of straight rain they seemed to be going strong until this afternoon. I noticed that the edges of all the squash, the broccoli, the blueberries, the raspberries, and all the leaves on the lower half of my tomatoes are turning bright yellow. Even the peppers are looking sickly.

    Each plant type is in a seperate bed and in some cases as much as 20 feet from each other. The soil for the vegetables is a mix of soil and compost. We added extra partially rotted leaves to the tomatoes but not the the others. The blueberries were planted in a mix of soil, rotted organics, and peat moss.

    We've done all kinds of searches on the web but so far nothing seems to match what we have. The closest we could find was a virus could be causing the yellow leaves on the tomatoes. Any thoughts at all?

    Ontario, Canada Zone 4-5
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Suffering the same problem here! Too much water and wet roots. Hoe around them to break up the surface soil and allow oxygen to get into the soil. They should come around unless the roots have rotted.

    Martin
     

  3. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    North Carolina
    Please send some of that rain down here. We're 8 inches shy for the year.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    We'd love to share except that it's not your turn to be happy this year! Last year, it was my area that was more than 8" shy for rainfall. Sometimes I prefer to be on the short side of rainfall since then one can better regulate the amount that the plants get.

    Martin
     
  5. Thoughthound

    Thoughthound Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Iowa
    Sounds like waterlogging. Time will correct most likely.

    Also keep in mind that yellowing may be a nitrogen defect.

    Rotted leaves are mostly carbon and in order to decompose they need nitrogen.

    So, they take nitrogen from the soil, and plants. Not a problem if you have lots of nitrogen.

    Good sources of nitrogen include lawn clippings, blood meal and composted farm animal poop.