Another Question Re Breeding

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by EIEIO, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. EIEIO

    EIEIO Member

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    Since Joker was born a premmie and weighed only a couple of pounds is it possible that this would affect his breeding abilities down the road? I do not want to sell him as a breeder ram if that is a possibility. To me that would just be dishonest. I have searched the net for an answer but I am not having too much luck.

    Thanks for any help you can give me or any sites that refer to this particular question.
     
  2. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Since he is practicly a pet, I think he is going to be dangerous when his hormones kick in. They do butt the hand that feeds them.
     

  3. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    I'd say more important than if he's a preemie is if he's a runt.

    My favorite ewe was a preemie, she stayed in the house for a very long time. When I first began taking her out to the pasture to eat I'd have to stay there with her or she'd follow me back to the house! She finally accepted her life as a sheep and is the most protective sheep on the place. I went out one day and found her in a face off with a coyote, the coyote had it's tail tucked between it's legs and by the time I got back out with a shotgun she'd run it off. She's knocked me on my butt in her attempt to kill my new LDG puppy, and she's been very productive having twins with nearly every lambing.
     
  4. Celtic_Knot

    Celtic_Knot Celtic Heritage Farms

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    No I would not keep any ram that had any flaw, at least not a flaw this large. Rams should only be kept from the top breeding stock, from the best lambings, and with the fastest grow rates, anything less would just damage a herds genetics.
     
  5. EIEIO

    EIEIO Member

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    Let me clarify what I wrote, if I do keep Joker he will be castrated since we already have a breeder St. Croix. My other choice was selling him as a breeder ram but I was afraid that him being a preemie would affect his sperm count. I don't want to misrepresent anyone and say he is a breeder if he can't breed.

    Whatever I decide I will be taking him out to the barn for an introduction to the sheep next week. I figure if I gradually introduce him to his "kind" it will be easier for him. I am going to let one ewe who is very gentle into another small area and see what happens. It will be "supervised" visits.
     
  6. MissKitty

    MissKitty Mrs. no longer OldGrouch.

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    Hi there Eieio...yeap you have the right idea about him possibly being sterile or less potent since he was a premie...This is true in cattle I know...He might be fine in the breeding dept. but there is a chance you would run...I think you have a beautiful little baby and he will be a pet for life...MissKitty :)
     
  7. fricknfarm

    fricknfarm Well-Known Member

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    I've had two rams. You would think that being bottle babies would make them easier to handle. Well, I found out from another group I belong to it's just the opposite. The more used to humans a ram is the more apt to butt he is. And bothe of my darlings were butters. Not me,but other people, my herding dogs, my 15 year old old buddy dog(just blindsided him for no reason, would've killed him too had i not been there).
    I had a tiny preemie too this year, had to take him in the house & milk his mom and feed him for about a week or ten days.
    I only have four sheep so it's not a hardship to keep him. Last week he went to the vet. I like to be fond of my animals, not gleefully look forward to divesting myself of them. Best to make your decision before too long as its easier on them to castrate/band early, the general concensus of sheep raisers way more experienced than I is that bottle rams are buttheads...
     
  8. EIEIO

    EIEIO Member

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    He will definitely be castrated if we keep him which I think is pretty much a given now. I want him to have a few more pounds on him so that when we do him we will only castrate the necessary parts. Right now he is so small that his nipples are right there next to his "boyhood" plus would need a very small band. He is up to a little over 3.3/4 pounds. He is eleven days old. Tomorrow I am going to put him in an outside cage with a bottom opening so he can enjoy the grass and the sunshine. I will set him where I can make sure he is okay. He is eating some grain and hay along with his high protein formula. He is at 6 to 7 ounces each feeding which is an improvement from his 2 ounce every two and a half hours feeding. If Joker had his way he would never be in his inside cage but running through the house. I don't guess you can potty train a lamb LOL!!!

    A great experience is being had by all and I just hope he keeps on thriving as he has been. I won't feel out of the woods until he is at least a month old.

    Thanks for your help everybody and suggestions.
     
  9. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info on keeping a ram. We kept 2 bottle ram lambs of cross breeding stock. We butchered one and kept one for breeding. He produced a nice ewe lamb of good size. Since he is our only ram, we will use him again. But we will also try to breed our ewes with another purebred ram in the future.