another feed question

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by jackie c, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I asked this question on the homesteading board and got no responses, hoping to get one here...


    Does anyone have a suggestion for a base feed formula? I need a pounds per ton of each ingredient.(the total of all combined will be one ton) I would like a 17% protein formula. I want to buy a bulk supply and add as I go, to bump up the protein requirements of the rations for each different animal and phase of their growth. I will be feeding pigs, chickens meat and layers, turkeys and ducks.

    I was hoping for a corn, oats and soybean meal mix, but don't know what quantities of each.

    Also all of these animals will be getting fresh garden surplus and grass too.
     
  2. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    So, are you going to be feeding all of the animals from the same base formula, supplementing as needed to meet the requirements of each particular species? The base formula at 17% protein?

    This is a fairly complicated question, which could explain the lack of response. If you go to the Poultry Forum thread posted by Paul Wheaton on 1/4/04, entitled "raising your own chicken feed," you'll likely find some helpful information there. You'll also find it's not quite so simple as you might think, especially if your animals are in confinement and have no opportunity to supplement vitamins and minerals by foraging.

    Good luck!
     

  3. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Jackie, we use a universal feed we have mixed by the ton. The ratio I use is 860lb cracked corn, 840lb whole oats and 300lb soybean meal.
    We have the feed mixed by the ton. The cost varies, but it's never been over $9.00 per 100lb.
    We feed this to all of our animals, horses, sheep, pigs, chickens, ducks, geese, guineas. Each animal gets a certain amount plus any extras, such as hay or alfalfa for the horses, the chickens free range, the pigs get scraps. etc.

    You might want to check with your local county agriculture agent. He will be able to tell you what crops are available in your area, that will keep the cost down.
    We have used this feed for over 10 years and love it. :)
     
  4. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much for the numbers, I can adjust for life stages of chicks and other poulltry breeds as well as the pigs. Its just the recipe I was looking for. I didn't think it was all that complicated, maybe the way I asked the question was though :rolleyes: :eek:
     
  5. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Jackie, when I let my hens raise their own chicks (my replacement hens), the mama's are real good at showing the little ones what to eat. They peck and scratch the mixture and pick out anything small enough for them to eat. :)

    Also, there are others here that have their feed mixed, I know some of them replace the oats with other grains. Just depends on what you have available in your area.
    Good luck to you. :)
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cowgirl, I find no fault with your universal mixture. The only thing that would bother me is the price of oats. Oats at the feed mills here cost $11.00 per hundred and corn only costs about half as much. However to feed it to horses the oats is far the better feed even if you feed less pounds total. If the oats are ground fine they are good feed for small pigs and chickens as well. Good doing animals is more important than the profit margine in a small opperation, but to make a go of it on a large scale, cost have to be below sales.
     
  7. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    What would be a cheaper subsitute for oats Uncle Will, I'm not feeding horses, just pigs and poultry.
     
  8. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Unk we do have a lot of horses to feed. If we didn't, I'd probably cut down the oats a bit and up the corn or add milo. One thing I was told a long time ago was that rolled or cracked oats cause trouble for sheep. I have always used the whole oats just in case. :)

    I was thinking that Mike in Pa substitutes oats with milo........I'm not sure if it was milo or ? It sure pays to check around to see what grows in your area. You will save money by using locally grown grains.
     
  9. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No one grows milo in this part of the midwest. I guess it can't compete with corn or soybeans as a cash crop. No one raises oats here anymore. The oats grown here don't have the test weight of oats grown closer to Canada. Once again its not cost effective to grow them anymore. When I was young every farmer had a field of oats that he used to feed his horses and pigs. I was always warned that chickens that eat their fill of whole oats could get craw-bound if they drank water and the oats swelled in their craw. Never seen it happen but I never feed whole oats to chickens either. ????
    Anyway the oats we feed our horses are shipped here from Wisconcin and Minn.
    $11.00 per hundred.
     
  10. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    jackie, I checked before with feed store here and the common knowledge of some farmers there saying oats is about the cheapest. Sometime Rye or Barley can be close to the same price around here. Depends on how much is grown locally, and oats is more common from year to year.
    The other thing I found is that when I would add some more whole oats to the chicken and duck feed, they preferred to pick out the other grains and left the oats mostly for the least preference. They liked whole wheat better than oats, if that's cheaper in your area. I'de also look into field peas. It seems to be grown more out west these days. Maybe it's a good feed source and not that expensive?