Another electrical question

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by agmantoo, Nov 14, 2005.

  1. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Both the black and the white wire are at the light itself. What you have is just the switch leg at the point where you have the black wire
     
  2. Janon

    Janon 993cc Geo Metro

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    Do you have a recepticle somewhere near the pantry? If so, and if that circuit is capable of the additional load, you can tap into that. If you have an attic above the room with the pantry, even better. You can usually find (or run) a connection point in the attic - then down the wall to the new light switch for the pantry.

    cheers,
     

  3. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ohhhhhhh. PantRy----that's completely different. Now I'm a little embarrassed and glad I didn't send my first thoughts.
     
  4. djuhnke

    djuhnke Well-Known Member

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    So I don't need to run ground? Just run the hot?
     
  5. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    Uhmmm if your wearing panties you have a bigger problem than a hot or neg wire!
    :D
     
  6. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You DO need a neutral ( not called a ground ) , which usually IS white.

    Your light in the dining room is a "switch leg", as agmantoo told you.

    What that means is the black ( hot ) and white ( neutral ) wires are in the ceiling box.....they simply took a black down to the wall box to feed the switch, and the black wire runs back up to the ceiling box ( hence the term, 'switch leg' )....you CAN NOT get another light to work independently off of that wall switch like you want to do. Got it ?

    And Janon told you how to run the light.
     
  7. djuhnke

    djuhnke Well-Known Member

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    Got it. Thanks for the help!!!
     
  8. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    TnAndy, I have read two of your posts today. As an industrial/commercial electrician for the last 20+ years, it is quite clear to me that you know your material, and are quite talented at explaining yourself. I have a different response to the original question here. With all due repect to the original poster, somebody who speaks of a branch circuit conductor as a positive, and doesn't know the difference between a neutral and a ground, should SERIOUSLY think about leaving the job to a skilled professional. As much as a lot of us rural folks like to think that we are jacks of all trades, electrical work is a lot more serious than other building tasks. Without getting overly dramatic, not knowing the difference between a ground and a neutral, can be a fatal lack of knowledge. If money is tight, grab a book on residential wiring from the library, learn first, do the job to the best of your ability, then ask a pro to take a quick look at it. I have been employed by two companies over the last decade that had electricians killed due to stupid mistakes, why take a chance on something you don't understand. Again, I'm not being critical here, just concerned for your safety, good luck.
     
  9. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    tiogacounty,

    Yeah.....that was my first reaction as well.....but I hated to point it out,...... but you are correct.....sometimes folks should admit their lack of knowledge in an area and seek more help than an internet forum just for their own good.

    I've done residential wiring, among other things ( and hold a state license in TN ) for 30 years. Was a homebuilder at one time and did my own wiring. Have done some industrial 3 phase stuff for a couple local sawmills, but not really of lot of it.

    I also don't get into remodeling electrical work too much, but occassionally get called on by friends to help with a problem......amazes me some of the stuff you run into and how cobled up you will find things done some times ( and not just electrical work....ahahahahaa ).
     
  10. hipehilbile

    hipehilbile New Member

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    Allow me to add my 2 cents


    As a Master electrician and electrical professional for over 15 years I have worked in all phases of the electrical industry from powerhouses to outdoor sheds and everything in between. I have seen a lot of rigged up systems. You can not be sure the Black wire is the hot wire unless you test it with a voltage meter! The voltage doesn’t care what color the wire is.

    Never assume anything with electrical work it may kill you or worse someone you love!

    That being said you can do it! The light requires a hot wire and a neutral and a ground wire. The hot wire supply’s voltage to the light and the neutral is the return path for the circuit and the ground wire protect you from being electrocuted by the fixture if one of the other wires comes into contact with a conductive part of the fixture.

    Remember to make sure all wires are de-energized before doing and work and test with a meter before starting to be sure.

    Installation consists of adding a switch in the hot wire before it goes to the fixture. The neutral and ground do not need to be switched. The easiest way to do this is run a piece of romex (sized to handle the load){15 amp max for #14, 20 amp max for #12, 30 amp max for # 10} to the fixture. Then run a piece to the switch location. At switch put black tape on white wire to cover insulation and make both wires look black. Do the same at fixture location this will keep confusion about hook up to minimum.

    Hook up at switch put one wire under each screw not critical which goes where but I usually put taped wire on top and black wire on bottom and connect ground wire to green colored screw on the switch . (Ground wire is bare)

    Hook up at fixture use wire connectors! Connect the ground wire of fixture to the ground wire from source romex and switch romex. Connect white wire form source romex to white wire on fixture if no wire then silver screw. Connect Black wire from switch romex to back wire on fixture if no wire brass colored screw. Last connect black wire from source romex to taped wire in switch romex. This will be a safe and proper installation.

    Feel free to email me at hipehilbile@yahoo.com if you need any further assistance with electrical questions or you just want to chat. Good luck and be careful electricity can kill you!

    hipe