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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
are there any pickling varieties of cucumbers that have all the fruit reach picking size simultaneously (over 2-3 week period) -as opposed to a few ready for a long harvest time?

I'd like to pickle like a maniac for a week to three weeks and then be done with it, if that makes sense. And I can't remember ever having a cuke plant do that sort of 'mass maturation' but thought 'what the heck, go ahead and ask'.

thanks
Cathy
 

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In this part of Wisconsin, the system is to plant a whole lot of cucumbers and then hope that they remain alive long enough for one or two big pickings. Even then, the plants will be dying from vine borers and mildew. If you can find Wisconsin SMR-58, that's about as close as you'll come to a disease-resistant pickling cucumber. But no variety is immune to the borers.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In this part of Wisconsin, the system is to plant a whole lot of cucumbers and then hope that they remain alive long enough for one or two big pickings. Even then, the plants will be dying from vine borers and mildew. If you can find Wisconsin SMR-58, that's about as close as you'll come to a disease-resistant pickling cucumber. But no variety is immune to the borers.

Martin

Thank you, Martin!

I got the 'craze' late last night and ending up ordering seeds online. Had somewhat come to that conclusion on my own and informed dh that we'd be digging yet another garden area this spring so we could plant way too many cucumbers. Figured the way to 'speed pickle' was to plant a whole lot so that you get the maximum fruit at the same time - you just made that more complex by adding the great rush to beat mildew and borers. Ah, the challenge! the great sport of gardening :)
 

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Cathy

I do as Martin does and plant a ton, more than I think needed at the same time. Most years it works but sometimes the bugs are hungry.

Josh
 

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Two years ago, I thought that I had the outfoxed the vine borers. I planted Charentais cantaloupe between the plants in a show-and-tell row of cherry tomatoes. The tomato vines almost smothered the young melon vines. Good crop was set before the borers found them. Last year, planted the cukes right in the middle of bean tepees and virtually 100% hidden from even human eyes. Most vines set 2 or 3 fruit, but some just barely made one. Didn't have a chance for usual powdery mildew before the borers found them.

Martin
 

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80 plants here , frost Late in October in central Florida killed to the Ground with a good five gallon bucket of 3/4" Cucumbers on the vine, No Pickles for me, but I still have the Jars for my Spring Pickles "I hope". Our frost happens around the late middle of Nov to Dec 20, What is this Late Oct.? . I will plant twice as much and cover any night when the Sky's are clear and the wind is out of the NW and any 3 degree drop in temperature regardless- Just gardening Guilt trip
 

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The vine borers can be eliminated by tilling the ground at least 6 inches deep. The vine borers' larva (sp?) overwinter in the ground, and a good thorough tilling kills them. Glenn Drowns (Sandhill Preservation Center) is in Iowa and he grows squash and pumpkin to sell the seed and he doesn't have vine borers. I would think cukes would be safe, too if a thorough tilling was done.
 

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Boy did you get that one right Martin. Two years ago here was my first "big" garden and I had no problems with any of my cukes, squash, melons. I had bumper crops and vines that were healthy until frost. So I reduced the number of plants for last year and that's when the borers found me. I was lucky to get 3 or 4 Kombucha squash and got maybe a dozen cukes, everything else was wiped out.
 

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In Wisconsin, we've had a wintering-over problem the past two years and this may become the third in a row. The 100"+ of snow received last winter insulated the ground to where volunteer potatoes grew from tubers barely a few inches below the surface. That meant that any insect larva at that depth was also safe. In 2005 and 2006, many in the community gardens had lovely squash and pumpkins. One woman had an 18' long arbor trellis affair and gave away cucumbers by the peck. In 2007, only the extreme SW corner of the complex was able to grow them. In 2008, nobody was spared but many simply didn't try. I knew that squash vine borers will skip cucumbers if larger vines are available and thus figured that I could hide the thickest part of the stem. That's what the borer moth looks for. Didn't work.

By the way, one female borer moth can cover a half acre. Our complex is 1½ acres and thus only needs 3 to survive a winter to affect every plot.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
well. that's a challenge, isn't it? hmmm. I'll plan for success and pickle everything else I can to cover our pickle needs. Good to know in advance that the odds may be against us if the snow cover continues.
 

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We don't have the borers, but i planted a bed of Boston pickling cukes 2 years ago and we filled way more jars than we needed. They are especially crisp when picked small.
I make mixed jars of onions and cukes here.
 
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