another case of Mad Cow

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jo, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. Jo

    Jo Well-Known Member

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    I can't believe no one has brought up this subject.......Ag. Dept is going to let Canada resume selling cows and beef to us in March......I know i will not eat beef when we go out......just eat our own meat. I like going out for hamburger or eating burritos / beef at our Mexican Cafe.
    The Cattle Industry is fighting this March date.....hope they win.
    Just a warning if you haven't heard.......
     
  2. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    Yes....I read this in this in the paper a few days ago. President Bush is "determined to stand good on our promise to Canada". Sometimes you've just got to wonder where his loyalty and support lies. How the heck do you suppose he thinks he got where he is at.......sure wasn't because anyone ouside the USA voted for him! Not sure what will be left of this once great nation in another 4 years. :mad:
     

  3. herefordman

    herefordman Well-Known Member

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    Nobody brought it up, because its on the Cattle thread.
     
  4. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Based on an analysis of the MCD outbreak in England, it is estimated the chance of someone getting vCJD from BSE-contaminated beef was on the order of one in several billion servings. That is not millions, but billions. Almost the entire population of England was repeatedly exposed to a beef supply contaminated for BSE, yet less than 140 acquired vCJD as the result out of a population of about 58M. That works out to something like one out of every 412K.

    My personal theory is almost all of those who acquired vCJD would have eventually died of CJD (which naturally occurs at a rate of about 1/1M deaths worldwide). Exposure to BSE just triggered it early.

    Even if BSE was in our beef supply, you would be far more likely to die of CJD than vCJD.

    Your stop eating beef is about like living in a cave because a commerical airline might fall on you.

    The American cattle industry has an agenda to keep out Canadian beef - it keeps the price of U.S. cattle higher. (And bear in mind I raise commercial cattle.)

    Personally I would be far, far more comfortable eating any beef from Canada over that which comes in from Mexico.
     
  5. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree! :)
     
  6. Bernadette

    Bernadette Enjoying Polish Rabbits

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    Thanks Ken.

    A couple of other points. To me it's obvious that with the report of this last case of BSE that the screening process now in place in Canada is keeping the infected cattle OUT of the food chain. Also, people may not realize that the problem tissue that could carry BSE is the brain, spinal column, and nervous system. This tissue no longer gets into the food chain, period. It's not roast beef and steak or even hamburger that would infect you, but more likely weiners, bologna, and other processed meat, which people are less inclined to think of when they're thinking 'beef'.

    Our Canadian screening system is working. I only hope the equivalent in the US is working as well. Does it not make you wonder when there are so many more cattle in the US than Canada that nothing has shown up there? Or have we just not heard about it?

    And Ken, the recent reports that you mentioned from the UK are really suggesting that this whole thing may be a big 'toodoo about nothing' as now they're not so sure that the disease actually spreads the way they thought it did.

    This latest reported case brings to our attention somthing that has been irritating me all along - Stop blaming the farmer! The farmer is totally dependant upon his feed supplier. And if there is an irresponsible feed mill, or even a careless feed mill employee who opens vat A to add protein from rendered dead animals instead of vat B that contains soybean protein - who's to know for sure? Or if a batch of feed is mislabled and the "Do Not Feed to Ruminants" is missing off the lable? Do you know what's really in that bag of feed you just bought? Just where do you think the protein content comes from - the cheapest sources they can find. Carcasses and downer cows from auctions and slaughter houses, experimental fetal pigs from the nearest University labs, vats of infertile or semi-hatched eggs from the local hatchery - you name it. (This is also the source of protein for many dog foods which is why that person on another thread who fed their goat dog food is really courting trouble!! He then home butchers that goat, eats it, and runs the risk of being infected). Feed dog food to dogs, goat food to goats, cattle food to cattle, chicken food to chickens..... Try asking the employees at your local feed store. But don't be surprised when they don't really have a clue as to the source of the protein - they may also have a stock answer that they've been told to provide by their bosses.

    Something to think about. How often do your children help you feed your animals? How easy would it be for your kids to give the calf a scoup of chicken feed instead of the dairy ration thinking he/she was giving the calf a treat? That's how easily contamination can ocurr.

    As for myself (Canadian), I say bring on the beef. Steak, roast, even hamburger. However, I can't remember the last time I had a hotdog....

    This post is not meant as a criticism. It's just meant to provide a bit of another perspective, and perhaps give people something more to think about.

    Have a great day!
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    "And Ken, the recent reports that you mentioned from the UK are really suggesting that this whole thing may be a big 'toodoo about nothing' as now they're not so sure that the disease actually spreads the way they thought it did."

    To follow-up on this. It is my understanding researchers have never been able to provide a solid, direct link between feeding animal protein in feed to BSE (MCD). Strong suspicions do not equal proof. Scrapies infected sheep carcasses have been used for meat and bone meal for likely well over 100 years. Why the sudden outbreak if that is the connection? Speculation is there was a switch to a processing procedure which didn't use as high of heat - but you just about cannot kill a prion short of being in ground zero during a nuclear blast.

    They did prove if you took brain samples from BSE infected cattle and injected them into healthy cattle, they came down with BSE. Not exactly the same thing as coming through a food source. (And they found the same direct infection with CJD from surgical instruments. The prions survived the sterilization process and continued to affect other brain operation patients.)

    Plus there are documented case where cattle in closed herds (no new animals introduced) and all feed grown on the same farm come down with BSE. As I recall, one of the human cases in England was a life-long vegetarian and the only link they could come up with was possibly they inhaled bone dust when using it was a fertilizer.

    I would much rather die of vCJD than most other diseases. It is rather benine and the end comes relatively quickly.

    I saw importing beef from Canada is a very, very low risk. You are far, far, far more likely to die of food poisoning from improper handling in your kitchen.

    Ken Scharabok