Animal Identification coming to Mississippi

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by southrngardngal, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    I just caught the tailend of a member of the Mississippi Board of Animal Health talking about why the ID is so important.

    Our partners want it: Japan and several other countries. Also, Applebees, Walmart and other stores want the meat they sell to be traceable. WAL_MART? That store that sells meat that smells like it rotted two weeks ago and they sprayed perfume on it?

    I have written my state representative and senator. I never heard from them. They are in special session right now so I need to give them a call.

    Isn't it ironic that this is the first that we have heard of this and it just happens to be while the congress is in special session. GRRRRRRR.....sneaky snakes.

    I am going to go call them and see what they can tell me about this.

    Jan
     
  2. DenverGirlie

    DenverGirlie Well-Known Member

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    Jan,

    I've gotten back nuerous emails and letters from my state and federal reps anout NAIS. They alwasy give me a carbon copy message stating it's for our own food safety and sometime even mention it will help with the testing for BSE (mad cow), etc. However, when ever I communicate back that it doesn't make any sense seeing that the federal governemt just lowered the daily testing for Mad cow from 1,100 animals a day to 100 animals a day, remarkable I never get any message back from them.

    I did also cc all of my "powers that be" in an email I sent to the Dept of VT agriculture praising VT about how they have stopped the enforcement of NAIS in their state.
     

  3. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    This has been going on for a few years now. We got to keep fighting it, preferably at the state level.

    VT is refusing to adapt NAIS and Wisconsin and another state are asking questions about protection of our information VS the Freedom of Information Act where anyone could ask for and get information about us and our animals.

    See http://www.nonais.org for more information how you can help fight this!
     
  4. farmer rog

    farmer rog Active Member

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    Nais is only to remove the little guys from raising a few cows or pigs or chickens. I have emailed all my reps and senators about this. They respond all the same. It is for bse. That's bull. BSE can be stop by not grinding up diseased cows and puting it in there feed. BSE can't be stopped any other way. The big boys ----the pork board, Cargill, and the evil Monsanto is behind this. Why would anyone buy a $10 radio tag and put on a $2 chicken. We have to stop this or it will be the end of the small livestock farmer.
    Farmer Rog
     
  5. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Your right Farmer rog except I think it will only be the end of small farmers in the free USA and other countries where it is forced on it's inhabitants. I imagine there are plenty of remote 3rd world countries who's inhabitants will go on living a self sufficient lifestyle long after americans are toatally dependent/enslaved.
     
  6. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    True this has been going around the country now for 2 years or more. Over a year ago WI. went to a Mandatory Premises ID and at present has about 50K places registered in the 3 step Program called the NAIS. Soon to follow other States will start mandatory Registration so far it has been on a voluntary basis.
     
  7. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Perhaps but it will by no means be a smooth path for the total enslavement of the US people. See what WI has to say about the 50k places in the article below taken from www.nonais.org News — walterj 6:49 am
    Momentum is growing as states follow Vermont’s lead and balk at the USDA’s proposed National Animal Identification System (NAIS). The USDA’s arguments for the NAIS are crumbling as more and more holes are found in the plan and people start recognizing just how badly NAIS violates our cherished freedoms.

    The issue centers around whether a database housed at USDA would be subject to a Freedom of Information Act request, said Mark Bosma, public information officer at the agency. Requests have been turned down by USDA, but lawyers at USDA told Kerr they didn’t know if those refusals would stand up if challenged in court.

    Since Vermont officials brought this to light, at least two other states, Wisconsin, which has more than 50,000 farms in its database, and Massachusetts have contacted Vermont agriculture officials to thank them for uncovering the confidentiality issue, the release said. Those states said that they, too, would be withholding farm names from the national database until USDA can guarantee strict confidentiality.

    Donna Gilson, spokeswoman for the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, provided a letter secretary Rod Nilsestuen had sent to USDA Chief Veterinary officer John Clifford seeking clarification about the issue.

    “If the…USDA cannot guarantee that Wisconsin premises registration information is exempt from FOIA, I hereby request USDA remove and destroy all Wisconsin premises registration information from the USDA national premises repository until such assurances are in place,” Nilsestuen said in the letter.
    -CattleNetwork

    The ball is rolling. We’ll start with the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) which protects our right to know. Fight against exclusion of Premises ID and NAIS data from the FOIA because if they hide the data then we have no way of verifying that they are not storing incorrect information about us. The FOIA must be respected and upheld. It is a vital component of a free and open democracy.

    This is just the start. We have got the government acknowledging that we do have some right to privacy. This is good. Let’s also get them to acknowledge our other Constitutional rights such as protection from unwarranted search and seizure as the USDA would do during the depopulation programs. That is a clear violation of our 4th Amendment Constitutional rights.

    The fact is there is no need for a mandatory National Animal Identification System (NAIS). There is no need to violate our privacy. There is no need to violate our rights. Terrorist control, disease control and food safety can be achieved through means that respect the basic foundations of our great nation. Get that message to your legislators!

    “It is the duty of the patriot to protect his country from his government.” -Thomas Paine
     
  8. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    That all maybe true but so is this and with the latest Mad Cow in Canada you can bet your house and your house cat that they will going after the NAIS very aggressively.

    http://www.informationweek.com/management/showArticle.jhtml?
    RFID May Be Key To Finding Latest Mad Cow Case

    Canada has spotted more cases of mad cow disease, and some U.S. experts say an aggressive RFID tagging program has helped find sick animals faster.
    By Laurie Sullivan TechWeb Aug 24, 2006 07:59 PM

    The Canadian Food Inspection Agency identified at least the seventh case of mad cow disease in the country since 2003, and U.S. livestock experts attribute the quick findings to technology. The agency confirmed Thursday another case of mad cow disease in an Alberta animal.

    The Canadian government several years ago created the Canadian Cattlemen's Identification Association to implement a national ID program. The association oversees radio frequency identification tag distribution and manages a database of information on livestock.

    "We know there's mad cow out there," said Richard Cronce, executive director of new business development at the Holstein Association USA, a nonprofit consortium of more than 35,000 dairy producers. "Canada seems to have a very aggressive testing procedure, and the U.S. needs to step up the process. The fact they managed to find so many isn't based on luck."

    Taking steps to protect the food supply in the United States, companies have begun designing systems that monitor the health of cattle. IBM Corp. and TekVet, a division of Colt Technologies LLC, Thursday launched a hosted system based on active RFID.

    An RFID sensor called TekSensor inserted in the ear of a cow collects the information from up to 500 feet, and sends the data wirelessly to receiving stations on a cattleman's ranch. A private satellite network transmits the information to TekVet's data center hosted by IBM, processing information for millions of cattle.

    Manual U.S. livestock identification procedures have been in place for years. But paper, pencil and spreadsheets began disappearing in September 2005, following much debate nearly two years after the U.S. Department of Agriculture identified a cow infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad-cow disease.

    Since then, the USDA has allocated $33 million per fiscal year, in federal funds to support the project during development. About 60 percent of the funding goes toward states and tribes to deploy the program, with the balance spent on IT development and staffing, said Neil Hammerschmidt, coordinator for the National Animal Identification System in U.S. Department of Agriculture services.

    There are three phases to the project, Hammerschmidt explained. The third begins early next year. It entails setting up a series of databases that will give the livestock industry the ability to track information across the U.S. "The technology part of the program is voluntary," he said. "It's the producer's option to integrate an electronic ID system."

    The USDA has spent the last few months combing through proposals from organizations and companies in the livestock industry that want to take part in building a national tracking system. The platform would include roughly 20 databases managed and maintained by private industry. Data from birth date to doctor visits and vaccinations for numerous types of livestock, including more than 90 million cows, would reside in those databases.

    Designing the system also means pulling together a communication infrastructure that allows state and federal health officials to send requests for information through the Animal Trace Processing System in the event of an outbreak, Hammerschmidt said.

    The Holstein Association could become an organization chartered to build and maintain one database. "The information will be held by private industry and the government will only have access to the information if something happens," Cronce said. "Today, the program to track livestock is voluntary, but I'm not sure how long it will remain that way."

    Volunteering to use the electronic animal identification system began in April. For dairy and cattle ranchers, that meant an option to use plastic ear tags embedded with radio frequency identification chips rather than just using a visual number on the outside or the tag.
     
  9. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    That may be Arabianknight but the USA is not Canada and there will be a lot of blood and negative repercussions if this program is forced on American homesteaders.
     
  10. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    That maybe also true but instead of acting like nut cases Try compromise, that is the way things are done in Government, Not this No I won't and bring out so much paranoia, and tin foil hat stuff, that sure are not going to be taken seriously until you act civilized and go for a compromise. Say a farm under X amount of animals is exempt., Or if you Only grow things to feed your family you are exempt, but not this throwing DooDoo on people and acting like Some of the PETA and all the extremists out there. You will catch more with honey then throwing carp around.
    Government then just looks the other way and heck with you guys no matter how hard you scream, because that is not the government operates. Compromise and you will get a lot further in getting it and keeping it on a voluntary basis for a private small farmer. Not go ragging all over throwing fliers at people and things like that.
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Once the USDA stipulates that all farmers that get subsidies are mandated to have the ID program in place it will be implemented regardless. The USDA uses this big $ ax already to get their programs in place and they will continue.