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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks for all the replies on the previous questions you have given me. But I still have more questions to ask. I probably will have several questions for the next 3 months.

What do you all use for a dirt sifter? Did you just make a small board frame with 1/4 inch square rabbit wire?

What all kinds of tools did you take with you while putting out traps? Pick, shovel, sifter, etc.

What's your favorite bait for what targeted animal?

Thanks everyone. Your replies are very much appreciated.
 

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I used to use a wooden sifter until I found a french fry basket. That holds plenty of dirt, especially in rocky soil where you have to pack dirt 50 yards to your set to have enough to sift.

I took a short handled heavy square mallet and got a flat pry bar. I cut the pry bar in half and welded half on my hammer for digging. It made a nice short digger and stake pounder and doesn't upset my carpal tunnel too much like a long handled hammer does. Some people I know like a 32 ounce Estwing hammer for digging and pounding stakes.

I put one knee on a cloth that I keep clean, plus my trap patch and lures and stakes or drags.
 

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I used a sifter as you described.

I carrried everything I needed in a modified 5 gallon plastic bucket. I had modified it by putting pouches on the outside to carry lures, bait jars, and urine. Inside was where I carried pancovers, sifter, trapping hammer, tarp,gloves, etc.


I had a multipurpose hammer (homemade) Used like a 3 lb. head with a longer welded piece on the backside I could use similiar to a pick. The head was welded onto a piece of pipe, which was then welded onto a larger piece that the end was opened up into a V, similiar to a shovel point. Was handy for making dirthole sets, as well as digging trap beds in hard or frozen soil. Could also use it pry up a stake if needed.

Baits and lures serve different purposes. I commonly used a bait, down a dirthole set. with a lure as a longer range attractant. You need to offer eye appeal, as well as scent, in most sets, if you want to maximize your catch ratio.

I usually made my own baits up, but some sets just used a lure, which I generally purchased. I tried lots of different makers, overall I found Russ Carmans to be the top producer for me, but I had good luck with all.

Location is the key ingredient in trapping any species, I believe! Coyotes were my main quarry, with a few cat sets thrown in.

Thanks for all the replies on the previous questions you have given me. But I still have more questions to ask. I probably will have several questions for the next 3 months.

What do you all use for a dirt sifter? Did you just make a small board frame with 1/4 inch square rabbit wire?

What all kinds of tools did you take with you while putting out traps? Pick, shovel, sifter, etc.

What's your favorite bait for what targeted animal?

Thanks everyone. Your replies are very much appreciated.
 

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I started using an old flour sifter but quickly converted to an old fry basket once I found one. My "day pack" was a 5 gal bucket with extra wire, gloves, small piece of plastic sheeting (for covering the ground at the set while I worked it without getting scent on everything), military surplus trenching tool for digging/pounding stakes, waxed paper for covering the pan/jaws to support the sifted dirt. My favorite sets;
1. Coyote- Scent post set. Can be baited with commercial lure or dog scat from your own male dog. Edit: Forgot to add the following- if you have access to a dead cow in a pasture the following set is deadly. Wire two traps to both the front and rear legs (if you have the traps, set one/two at the nose and back as well). Cover traps about 6"-8" from the hooves. Deadly because coyotes can't pass up walking around the carcass and will naturally funnel around the hooves to check it out. This set often results in multiple catches the same night (I've caught as many as six yotes at one carcass in the same night).
2. Fox- Dirt hole at the intersection of two roads/paths with a single chicken wing feather suspended above the entrance by sewing thread.
3. Bobcat- drag set placed on a path exiting/entering the thickest thorny thicket you can find. No bait, just a step stick on either side of the trap. Occasionally I would throw in a small section of log that had rotted the bark off leaving a very smooth surface. Place log perpendicular to the trail. Cat's seem to be magnetized to scratch their claws on it.
4. ****- water set. Set a rock/log/stick out in the water about 2ft from shore and put some feathers on top. Scent from any road kill **** will work as a lure if you want to add it. Place the trap about six inches from shore in about 2"-3" of water.

Good luck,
David
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tips folks. I guess last night I gave something a good lesson about steel traps. I have a few old traps around here. Small ones. Single long spring pan traps. I set one out near the creak bank right off the hill from my house on a trail that runs along the bank. I had no ideal of what's using it and still don't after having something spring the trap and eat the bait up. I used a piece of pvc pipe filled with sweet feed and syrup and screwed it to a fallen tree limb. Then placed the trap right below the feed tube.

Went back this morning to check it and the trap had been sprung, the feed tube empty. So either my trap wasn't big enough or it was a critter big enough to get out of the trap. Will probably have a hard time catching him again.

I have new double long spring traps ordered and are suppose to be here Monday by UPS. I'll be trying them out later this week.
 
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