anchoring a barn

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by caberjim, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    We are getting set to put up a Clearspan barn from FarmTek - heavy cover over pipe framing - as a tempory barn that will eventually evolve to a greenhouse when we can afford a full-sized permanant barn. It's going to sit on a large concrete slab where the original barn was prior to it burning down. I'm looking for suggestions on how to anchor it down to the slab. It will weight well over 1000lbs built, but we get some decent gusts of wind in the fall/winter when the trees are bare. Any advice would be welcome.

    Thanks
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    We have a 40x60 Cover-all anchored in 16 -45 gallon drums of concrete. Overkill for sure. There are 3/4 inch anchor bolts rated for many thousands of pounds you simply drill into the base and they will hold. I have a 7 ton hopper bottom grain tank anchored like that.
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Go to whatever store you buy your bulk bolts from, and get some concrete anchor bolts. They are tapered, you drop them in a hole, tap them down. Take the nut off the top, attach your building, tighten them down. The tappered sleeve will lock tighter & tighter as you tighten them down.

    Also get a concrete drill bit. You might want a cheap concrete hammer drill as well, the Chineese stuff doesn't last long, but would last enough for this project & save your 'good' drill.

    Talk to the oldest person that about the size & number of anchors you will need.

    --->Paul
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Here is a pic and a chart for the concrete anchors. From the chart you will get an idea as to the size needed after asking the manufacturer of the building what his engineer recommends for an area subject the the winds you experience.
    http://www.confast.com/products/concrete-sleeve-anchor.asp
     
  5. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Since you are going to install the barn on a slab thatis existing, simpley do the layout with strings, find the place to place the anchor bolts, drill out over sized holes, place your bolts in the holes and fill in around then with 'flowers of sulfa' , available at any drug store. With the bolt head downward, ignite the sulfa from the up wind side, in about 10 minutes the smell will be gone and you will need to break the concrete before the bolts will pull out. Its used to hold major machines down to the floor, hundeds of ton machines.
     
  6. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    great advice. Many thanks. I shall look into all of them.
     
  7. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    You've got a preexisting slab you are going to build on. Its been suggested you use anchor bolts in drilled-in holes. This will work, I've done it recently but drilling the holes can be a pain.

    I found it much more easy to "shoot" the sill plate (the lumber or metal that contacts with the slab) in. Home Depot sells a cheap "gun" for shooting the plate in for $19.95. Plus the special nails. The gun uses special 22 shells with different amounts of charge.

    These held every bit as tight as the anchor bolds and were a WHOLE LOT easier and faster.
     
  8. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    A 5/8ths bolt shear strength is 16,000 pounds in grade 5 bolts, imagine one every 4 feet and add your local wind shear strength times the square foot of surface of your walls. What ya' gonna' do when the wind comes for you? Forgive my silliness, there is a new woman in my life. ;) Really have trouble with those 'used' ones!!!
     
  9. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    Talk to others in your area to see what you need. There's a point where anchoring it down any farther just doesn't matter because winds will get high enough to just twist the trusses like pretzels, in fact you might be better off if the anchors let go. In our area we found that happens at about 70 km/h. Lots of Coveralls, Super structures etc. that were destroyed in wind storms last winter and replaced with conventional structures because people can't afford to make that mistake twice.