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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anybody tell me if i should buy this old thing to try plowing with my old Massey Ferguson 12(12hp).
Found it in a field when i was out counting Ash trees for a municipality. Farmer told me I could have it for $100...

A new one furrow plow is $500+ and the reviews are not great. But what i am not sure about is the modifications needed to attach the old plow to a one point hitch.. and is it worth the effort? Any thoughts?

After plowing I have a 1977 troybilt horse to till, which runs well and is itching to be used:)
 

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I think you will find it's more trouble than it's worth to try to reengineer a horse drawn plow to fit a single point hitch and still have some control of the depth.
 

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An old rusty plow will not scour very well until the rust is off it, either by wire brushing, or by a very long time in the ground with you fighting it to keep the soil from sticking to it.

Is this a walk-behind plow, or does it have a frame and wheels.? And is the one point hitch a power lift, or drawbar pulled? Non-power lift will need handlebars and an operator, along with the tractor driver. Frame and wheels will have to be at same height as the drawbar to pull into a furrow, along with a lever to adjust the depth and level of shear. You might rig a double clevis to attach it.

A twelve HP garden tractor might pull a shiny 10 inch to a depth of six inches. A bigger plow will take more HP, but you could get it to a better depth.

If I thought it could work, I might pay $25--$50. Surprised the plow survived the scrapyard. Another point is if you will be able to find another shear(share) to match a worn out or broken one.

geo
 

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Smooth the moldboard. Weld up and sharpen the pint. Insure the landside is concave. Buy a pair of handles. Rig up a hitch on your tractor, that holds the hitch at the proper height. Make sure the plow's hitch has the multi-hole hitch bracket so you can adjust the plow left to right for even plowing. You'll want about 6 feet of chain, so the plow can stay in the ground without the hitch holding up the front of the beam.
Then find someone to drive the tractor as you learn which way to push on the handles to steer the plow left right and up and down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I love totally opposing views on whether or not it will be possible.... Actually I learned how to remove rust with electrolysis so I bet i can get that plow almost as shiny as the day they bought it.. might take a week or so in the tub lol... yes it has barely survived the scrap yard, it is in a pile of old steel stuff just waiting for a truck to haul it out of a ditch:(.

I will double check and get pictures on Monday, I think i did see a multi hole hitch but must confirm. It is a walk behind and i will need new handles. No wheel(s) at all and where the disc is on newer models, there is a large knife to cut ground. I will update soon, Thanks for the input!!
Barefootfarm.. my brother is with you on this one haha
 

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I love totally opposing views on whether or not it will be possible....
Most things are "possible".
Many things just aren't worth the effort and costs.
If you have someone to drive while another works the plow it can be done, but I think you'd be better off to get a disk plow you could run by yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
totally understand what you mean. Not being familiar with plows in general, i am not even sure what the difference is between a disk plow and a furrow plow.. All i know is i need to get at least 6-7 inches into ground and it's a bit much for the troybilt horse... cost is also a factor of course.
 

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Do you have a rototiller? If that's the case you should really goo for a single shank chisel. Something to shatter the ground. Both a mole board and tiller will create a hard pan. How big of an area are you trying to do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am prepping 1/2 acre for garlic. My tiller came with a furrow/hiller, tomorrow i will see if i can extend it with a chisel type end. though the soil has become so dry this month i doubt breaking ground will be easy.
I am not worried about hard pan though because i will be adding large amounts of organic matter and managing it with cover crops after it's opened up
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am thinking for $100 it's worth a try, as a buddy said at worst it becomes a lawn ornament relic.. The 6' chain might help keep the pressure in the right place no?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It rained all day so I rigged a single shank onto a furrow attachment to the tiller. Will give it try in the morning
 

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A couple of things about you garden tractor. Is it really a garden tractor or a lawn mower. First is it a hydro or a gear drive. Second, how are the rear wheels attached, are they bolted on or is there a key way in the axle that the wheels slide over. A true garden tractor will have bolt on wheels, usually 4 or 5 studs. If the wheels are mounted using the key way, it is a lawn mower and will not handle ground engagement tools. If it is a garden tractor you can easy add a sleeve hitch to the rear. (look up sleeve hitch on internet) With a sleeve hitch there are implements that can used. You may have to do some fabrication to attach it, depending on how the back of the tractor is made.
I have two garden tractors, a John Deere 314 (14. Hp) and a 26 Hp Dixon (made by husky) Both have sleeve hitches. I have a regular moldboard plow, several different cultivators, and other tools. Have converted a push seeder to attach to the sleeve hitch, can plant a 100 ft row or corn in about three minutes.
Not sure what part of the country you are in, but the midwesr and east, good quality used garden tractor can found at a reasonable price. Here in the NW, used ones are harder to come by.
They are fun to use and are a time saver. I plow, disk, plant, cultivate, and harvest root crops with mine. It called getting lots of seat time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Actually the farmer who was taking the hay off that 1/2 acre just offered to plow it for me, since he is happy to get rid of taking care of it haha.
This is actually my tractor http://www.tractordata.com/lawn-tractors/000/1/7/175-massey-ferguson-12-attachments.html
I have steel wheel weights and chains. After he took the hay off I went over the land with the massey and a tow 3 gang reel mower to take the grass down lower.. I hope after he plows he will disc. It is a fun little tractor but does have it's limits:(
 

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That would be classified as a garden tractor. At one time you could even buy a loader for it. Its not a farm tractor, can not pull a hay baler with it, but you would be amazed at what it will do with the right implements. $100. well spent if not a basket case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That would be classified as a garden tractor. At one time you could even buy a loader for it. Its not a farm tractor, can not pull a hay baler with it, but you would be amazed at what it will do with the right implements. $100. well spent if not a basket case.
I've put out the word to all who frequent the kinds of places you might find a treasure like those attachments! I've also looked for the sleeve just haven't had time to find the right one to buy but it's a must have! It really is just the right size for a small farm project to start. Will check out the subcompacts if the garlic is a success. People are using subcompacts on farms up to about 25 acres so really the massey could be fine for a while:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It rained all day so I rigged a single shank onto a furrow attachment to the tiller. Will give it try in the morning
BTW, just in case anybody needs to do the same with their tiller, this worked however 3" deep is all the tiller could handle.. will make it into an attachment for the massey next year as i am sure 6-7" would not be a problem.

Bought some buckwheat today so the first cover crop will go on as soon as the plowing and discing/tilling is done:).. and after some stone picking and manure..
 
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