ammonia

Discussion in 'Goats' started by sancraft, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    My goats are in a room with a concrete floor. I clean it daily and put new straw down. About evry 4 months, I clean and scrub the floor, lime and put down new straw. There is a strong ammonia smell that I can't seem to get rid of. I scrubbed the floor on Monday and yesterday, it reeked of ammonia again. What can I do to neutralize the ammonia?
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A product called barn fresh works good or baking soda under bedding ( after cleaning)
     

  3. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    Concrete is not ideal for a floor. Mine floor is made of flat paving brick layed with conrete and I have the same problem. What I do in the fall before it gets cold, I put a 2x10 inch board on its side. It is about 14feet long. I put it 5 feet out from the wall and keep adding pine shavings and hay from the manger that falls to the ground which is inside this area. Shavings seem to stay dryer that the hay. After this builds up about four or five inches high it starts staying dry on top. They will pee and poop on it some but after it keeps building up higher and higher it stays dry on top and the smell isn't so bad either. This also gives off heat from the poop , shavings and hay which is decomposing on bottom. This helps keep their sleeping area warm. By the time it gets really cold (to us)here(jan. and Feb.) there is about 8 or so inches build up. I do use a little lime in the begining. On the other side of this board I keep cleaned up and is my path to the milk room. When spring comes, I lift the 2x10 up that slides down between two slots on each end and haul it all waste to the garden. :) The botton that is against the concrete will be wet and half rotted, but the top will be nice and dry. I was working myself to death doing as you are trying to sweep and clean ever few days and put down new straw. Concrete can be very cold and wet, so it took a thick layer of straw every few days. :( I also clean the area real good with stong detergent after clean up in spring. Hope this will help and give you some ideas.
     
  4. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I have found that wood ashes work great in keeping down ammonia smells. I usually have alot around during the winter months :) Just make sure they are totally cold before using.
     
  5. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Dee, I think that I may have heard that before, but gotten. We burn alot of wood also during the winter. I usually save the ashes for the garden or pasture. I will sprinkle some down before I add my next batch of of saw dust and shavings which will probably be tomorrow. :) I knew that ashes took the acidity out of the soil much as lime does and that lime is used in the barn so it sees very practical the these could be used. Good tip. :)