Am I racist? ?? about Chuno

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Grandmotherbear, Dec 18, 2004.

  1. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    really don't think I'm racist-I try to hate everybody equally and on their merits (or demerits) but i was relating this story to Grandfatherbear and Rainsong (daughter's board name) while the grandchildren were playing. There's a lot of hispanic bodegas around town and I like to check them out for unusual foods. Ifind them a much more reliable and inexpensive source for things like chayote, boniatos, etc etc, and we like to try new foods and stuff. Anyway, at Sedanos, one of the larger chain type stores, I found packages of dried giant corn kernels, dried miniature ears of purple corn, and packages of chuno (freeze dried high altitude low moisture potatoes). I would love to try them but the packages only say what they are- not how to cook them.

    So I asked the Hispanic team at the Hospice- the "Abriendo Puertas" team- how to cook them and they had never heard of them.
    Probably because their families came from coastal cities and not the mountains, or because it's peasant fare (how many yuppie princesses could cook dried beans or make pancakes from scratch, after all) But I expected my family to know what chuno was- after all, I've known about it since I was a kid- and my daughter didn't know about it (I've got scads of books about South America in the house, and I know she raed almost everything in the house growing up!)
    Rainsong said That what I did was tantamount to asking a black for a good fried chicken recipe. Was it?

    I've googled chuno, and al I found out was to soak it in several changes of water, till it's no longer bitter, and boil it till it's cooked. No idea how long that takes.

    I would love to try it. It's made of Andean black potatoes.I have a book on potatoes and am just fascinated by all the varieties.

    Was I out of line?

    Forgive the typos- arm in a cast and both arms hurt like billy blue blazes.
     
  2. Becky H.

    Becky H. Well-Known Member

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    No. I wouldn't consider it out of line. You had a question, and you sought an answer from someone that might know it.

    I do not see that as behaving stereotypically. Now, if you were ticked that they didn't know it and really really thought they should know it, then yep, you're guilty!

    I've never heard of a chuno. I think you were right on the money with different locations having different foods. I didn't learn this myself til I saw different types of foods offered than what I was used to. For example, the green sauce over the red sauce on enchiladas. I like red on my enchiladas who ever uses green? Some do, I just didn't know it! My mother explained to me farther south america probably use green frequently. Although I do like a good Chile Verde, but no green sauce on my enchiladas please!!! Also sea food. I don't eat sea food tacos, no no! The coastal people did alot I bet though! Just not my family.

    Also, I moved to the South last year. I didn't know what chitlins and hog jowls were. I had to ask someone at the store, and it happened to be a black lady. She didn't take offense. I could have asked some white person they might have known as well. But the black lady was right there available to ask and I wanted my quesiton answered.

    If your intent was pure, then don't worry about it.
     

  3. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank you for the vote of confidence.
     
  4. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    There's a difference between asking a question you already know the answer to so that you can feel superior, and asking a question because you really just don't know the answer.

    If you alread know the answer and you just want to feel superior, then that I would consider rascist and just plain unacceptable behavior. But that's not what you did. You saw this new thing and asked a question about how to cook it. There isn't anything rascist at all about that!
     
  5. john#4

    john#4 Well-Known Member

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    Grandmother,

    Contact the company. Many will have a little booklet on howtos. Look for an address or web site on the package.
    John#4
     
  6. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    I'm black and I have a great fried chicken recipe. I wouldn't be offended by your asking. If I wanted to know how to make and Italian dish and I knew and Italian, I'd ask. Wouldn't it be better to get it from the horse's mouth?
     
  7. jejabean

    jejabean Well-Known Member

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    I think it is so sad that all of this p/c crap has us more afraid to talk to one another than before. I've had really racist things said to me, and I was able to twist it around so well, that the two of us ended up laughing...maybe that is the difference some people can't find the humor in anything...I do get my knickers in a knot...but usually I just chalk it up to ignorance. But getting back on track....I would not be offended if someone asked me how to prepare chitlins...actually I'd be kind of flatteed considering their bad rep. Love those chits!
     
  8. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Grandmotherbear: I grew up in an area of many colors. When I came to the Midwest, where people are more prejudiced, I found that I didn't know many of the "hot" topics to avoid, because where I lived those topics were not touchy ones.

    For example, asking a Black person about fried chicken. How could I know that that some people would take it personally? I once mentioned to a mixed group that watermelons were on sale and I thought that I would get one. How was I to know not to? I did NOT know about some stereotypes!

    As a result, many Black people thought that I was prejudiced, which is silly because I am PROUD of my families Ethnic mix. My Family consists of many colors. Brave, hard-working people from many lands with many useful customs and skills. They can all tell killer stories about their ancestors, too.

    So what if I have my Grandmothers red hair and freckles? Does that make me different from my 2 Sisters who are brunettes?

    I did not understand it at first. But, after having lived in the Midwest a while, I DO understand why some people are touchy about race. I have had perfect strangers start ranting about the blankety-blank this and the blankety-blank that and how they ALL want to cheat, lie, and steal. And, every last one prided himself or herself at how well he was able to hold his tounge while talking to members of other races. Eye-opening, to say the least.

    And, yes, I have seen that prejudice is not a White monopoly, too. It's a human trait, not a White trait.

    I just decided a long time ago that people were wierd, and that I was not as tactfull as I would like to be.
     
  9. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I must be racist because I solicit recipes from one of my black co-workers all the time. She has an extended family of wonderful soul food cooks, and she doesn't seem offended when I ask.
     
  10. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think it's amazing that we have gotten to the point that even noticing a person's race is tantamount to being racist.

    When I was in college (1984-89), was sitting at dinner with several whites, and one of only a handful of blacks. He was a great guy with an incredible sense of humor.

    We had chocolate pudding for dessert and it had whipped cream topping.

    My black friend had gotten some whipped cream on his hand and I was watching it go up and down as he was telling us some story and talking with his hands.

    I finally said outloud, "Will you get that whipped cream off your hand, you look like an Oreo cookie!"

    The two of us about died from laughter as the other whites at the table gave very hesistant and nervous laughs. You would have thought I'd used the N-word.

    I looked around and asked, "What, you didn't realize he was black?"

    I also had an East Indian friend who we were constantly telling to stop smiling because he was blinding us all with his bright, white teeth. He would usually respond with, "Shut up, honky!"

    Race, color, culture, etc. are part of what people are and failing to acknowledge that is also a shame as is racism.
     
  11. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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  12. reluctantpatriot

    reluctantpatriot I am good without god.

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    My view is that PC thought has made all the "-isms" worse, from racism and sexism to culturism and classism. I used to think that differences were just surface qualities and we were the same in the core. After PC thought came along when I was starting college (1993-1997) I was so afraid to even ask about someone's differences in fear that I would be accused of racism as I am white as snow...darn Irish roots make me burn rather than tan! :p

    Seriously though, it has gotten to the point for me that I think a good number of non-white Americans are racist, and that is socially acceptable. It is ok for a black person to dislike Asians or Hispanics, or for another skin tone, except for white, to dislike another. Additionally, it is also common for Christians and white people to have their traditions, like Christmas, be cut down as racist.

    The more PC society tries to become, the less I am willing to tolerate differences. The reason is because I am being bombarded with the view that my history and ancestry and traditions are racist. I find it rather interesting that what is mine is racist, but that of another non-white is not. If they want to play it like that, then I think that all of our ancestry and history and traditions, the whole lot is racist. There! That way we can all be equally racist, and therefore it cancels it all out. :p

    If they don't want Christian prayer in school, fine, but do not talk about letting Muslims or Jew or any other religion have their prayers in school. If you don't want to talk about Christmas or Easter or Thanksgiving in school, fine, but do not think about talking about any other culture's holidays or festivals. We can either allow all aspects or none at all. I think that all cultures and traditions can be celebrated if we are allowed to share them. If we pick and choose which ones we can present, then we make it clear which ones are not valued.

    What does this all have to do about asking for a recipe for a food item? Simply the observation that we worry now about offending someone if we ask them about something we think they may know about. Our society makes the threat of racism worse because we flaunt differences in a way that make them glaring rather than in harmony with our melting pot culture.

    What upsets me most is being attacked because I own firearms, hunt, raise livestock and enjoy living off the land as best I can. I almost want to laugh in the face of someone who thinks I am a redneck hillbilly backwards hick. I have seen the world and earned two college bachelors degrees. I have learned that being of the world is not what I desire. Doesn't mean that I don't know about the world and urban areas or other cultures. I welcome new ideas and culture so long as it doesn't try to destroy mine in the process.
     
  13. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    I found a recipe, hope it's tasty.

    Chuño Phuti
    (Dehydrated-frozen potato side dish)
    Ingredients:
    ½ pound dried chuño
    2 teaspoon salt to cook chuño
    ¼ cup oil
    ½ cup white onion, finely chopped
    ¼ cup tomato, peeled and finely chopped
    1 fresh cheese, crumbled
    3 whole eggs
    1 teaspoon salt

    Preparation:
    One night before preparing, put chuño to soak in lukewarm water.
    On the following day, peel chuño, removing all its rind. Cut chuño into four parts and rinse with water several times until the bitter flavor disappears.
    Put chuño to cook with enough water and the two teaspoon of salt. Once cooked drain all of its water.
    In a separate pot put the oil. Place the pot over moderate heat. Once it warms up, add the onion. Stir fry until the onion is golden. Add the tomato and salt, mix and let cook for about five minutes. Add the eggs and mix again.
    Add chuño already cooked, mix well and let cook for about five more minutes.
    Finally, before serving, add the cheese and mix very well over low heat.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Chuño
    Dry, dehydrated and fozen potato that constitutes the typical food of the inhabitants of the highlands of Bolivia.
     
  14. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    You know... I read this thing thinking "I would ask a Jewish woman if she knew how to make matzos... what's the difference?" I would expect that her mother might have taught her this traditional dish.

    I have a friend who is southern... would it be weird to ask her if she knows how to make gumbo? It is a regional dish.

    Would a Texan be enraged if I asked about good BBQ?

    And hey... if anyone wants to know how to make and serve traditional sugar on snow, this Vermonter would be happy to give you the recipe!

    Ptewie on PC!
     
  15. Sarah K.

    Sarah K. Well-Known Member

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    Not to hijack the thread, but how do you make sugar on snow? I've tried and I either get the syrup too hot and melt the snow, or it isn't warm enough. Do you need a candy thermometer?
     
  16. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I'll go one beyond your, uh, non-hijacking. What is sugar on snow?

    I mean, I figure there's like sugar and snow involved...
     
  17. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I find it highly suspect that given the topic, that both sugar and snow are white. :haha:
     
  18. John_in_Houston

    John_in_Houston Well-Known Member

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    And I find YOUR statement highly suspect! I am personally acquainted with brown sugar and yellow snow!!! :haha:
     
  19. Kshobbit

    Kshobbit Well-Known Member

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    I am curious about the snow on ice recipe too. My mother used to make something we called snow ice cream. that was back when the snow was still clean but so was everything else.
    If you want to ask someone from the south about recipes, ask about banana pudd'n or grits and redeye gravy. You need to got to Louisiana for a good gumbo recipe. The Hawaiians know how to roast a whole pig.
    We have Mexican food nite at the cafe here in Kansas. It is really good but one nite a couple of Hispanic ladies came in and they ordered hamburgers!!!
    I don't think it is racist to ask a certain ethnic group for instructions on how to cook something they are known for making. I love to cook and love getting new recipes. My friends and family are rainbows and they are not offended by an honest question. Most folks can tell if you are being hateful.
    I still love the banana pudd'n I got to eat in Tennessee. In fact most everything I got to eat there was really good. I never did get the recipe either.
     
  20. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My father was an agricultural economist who grew up in farm country and literally brought his work home with him- we spent a lot of vacations touring food processing plants and abbatoirs...yes, at the tender age of 6 and 7. Thumper, I wisht I'de seen that TV special. I also knoew the Andeans have more lung capacity and a higher amount of hemoglobin in their blood to transport oxygen. And thank you for the recipe almost there.

    Don't suppose anybody has a recipe for dried giant corn or mini purple corns???