Am I Correct?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by NWSneaky, May 2, 2005.

  1. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    The owl is the only nocturnal predator fowl of which I am aware?

    It is not migratory but territorial; ergo it will not fall under the Federal Migratory Bird laws?

    Perhaps though it is a protected species?

    TIA.
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    As far as I know it is the only nocturnal predator fowl.

    Yes, it is DEFINITELY protected.
     

  3. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Don't Shoot any Owl! Unless you want to under government scrutinity.
     
  4. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

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    It is my understanding that ALL predatory birds (i.e. raptors and owls) are federally protected. I know one has to have a federal permit to handle and care for injured raptors and owls. If you do not have that permit, it is illegal for one to even have feathers of the above in one's possession.

    ~Berta
     
  5. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    They are all protected, & crows,ravens & buzzards too.
     
  6. wy0mn

    wy0mn Transplanted RedNeck

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    Owls are raptors & protected by the same laws as the hawks & falcons. (I've been studying for my Falconers License.) The lady on the other thread is correct and is probably a falconer or an avid birder.
    Crows are not protected here in Tennessee, although they do have a season.

    From the TWRA website.
    Crow (Fri., Sat., Sun. only) Jun. 1 Feb. 28 No Limit
    Most of my contemporary rednecks couldn't tell a crow from a raven & we have both! So I suppose they are both legitimate targets.

    Sort'a like all hawks used to be 'chicken hawks', even an itty bitty Kestrel!
     
  7. Judy in IN

    Judy in IN Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you're finding poultry with the head, neck, and part of the breast torn off--it's an owl.....And it will always be your best layers. If they are very small, like bantams, the whole chicken can be gone. SSS....