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Banjo Makin' Farmer Dad
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like the Idea of raising pigs for home and small profit. I live in western NY near Buffalo. I have about an acre & 1/4. What is the least expensive way to get into raising pigs. I have a one care garage I'd be able to convert to a barn. It has a cement floor.I could put a barn door w/ some outside access if I had to. Do pigs need consnt access to an out door pen. I have many more questions plus ofcourse I dont know what I dont know. so any positive info would be great. Thanx to all that respond.
 

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By all means give them access to the outdoors. The concrete is hard on their legs and you could end up with some crippled hogs. Inside raised hogs are also more susceptible to respiratory illnesses. Plus, you're looking at a very labor intensive situation, if you go with the confinement set-up.

The least expensive way to decide how committed you want to be to raising hogs would be to purchase some feeders, (not weanlings cause they cost more) and raising them up to full butcher weight. They'll be halfway there, so it won't take as long either. You can then put pencil to paper, after your learning curve, and decide if you want to dive in completely. But not to worry, if you make any mistakes, you can always eat them, literally and figuratively. Some mistakes just make the meat more expensive.
 

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KS dairy farmers
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Ryan - If you live near Buffalo, due to the special considerations that arise as a result of Lake Effect Snow :help: , I would give some thought to following:
One plan would be to keep your production seasonal. Perhaps buy a group of feeder pigs late Spring to early summer, then have them butchered and in the freezer by Thanksgiving at the latest.
If, however, you enjoy the hog chores so much that you must stable hogs year 'round(Like certain individuals afflicted by the dreaded hog fever, LOL), then you will want to do some facilities layout planning: For example, have a storage area where you can lay in 5 days or more worth of feedstocks where they will stay dry, and you close enough to the hogs that you do not find yourself carrying buckets of feed &water over massive snowdrifts in a total whiteout. Also, you will want the hog facilities close enough to a path that you allready clear of snow so you don't have to add to snow removal just to get to the hogs.
Now, mind you, hogs over 45 pounds don't mind the winter weather and will do just fine if they have a roof, 2-3 walls for windbreak and a deep mat of straw or hay to burrow in.
The cheapest way to get into production is to buy weaned feeder pigs. Also it is the easiest. I agree with Plowgirl that Hogs will fare better if they have access to dirt or sod. Perhaps you could build some run pens off of the garage and just allow them in when shelter or shade are needed?
Good Luck with the Pork :1pig: Production.
 

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Banjo Makin' Farmer Dad
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214 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you. Winters are tough around here. I live up on a hill w/ about a mile of field behind me and its on a high way. Snow removal is a huge cosideration. The garage is on the plow path already. It opens to my existing driveway/parking lot.its about 34 feet of my line so there is room for outdoor penning behind it. I'd be ok w/ cutting an opening for pig access into it. Kind of a project though. $$$. Might take a bit to get That far w/ my set up. I like the Idea of it though, and just writing this response my project mind is spinning. Pretty sure I have farm fever already, not just for hogs. I got chickens and game birds already and that set up keeps on growing as well.

You guys got me thinking ahead of myself I think. lol.

What I have now is a 8 x 12 garge. It is connected to another garage that has heat . There is a door between the two and I could do something their to make it pig friendly and practical for me. I could keep feed in the 2nd garage if need be.

I was thinking I could get a young (what age ?) female. Raise her up. Get her bred(What age ?) to a boar. Sell the weaners (What age?) and put mother in th freezer . keeping 1 or two for raising breeding and selling weaners. and so on. Would / could this work. Dose anyone do this. I know my facilities would need to get more intense/streamline as I went. or even if no need they just would get bigger and better as I go.
What do you all think?
 

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KS dairy farmers
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3,841 Posts
Storey's Guide to raising Pigs is a good, comprehensive place to start. Takes you up to the butchering phase. Other texts are available for that.
I would start small, raise out a group of 2-4 feeder pigs. Learn how to move hogs, feeding, fencing, and such. Then select a male and 1-3 females(not littermates) for breeding and go from there. Most mainstream breed hogs(York, Hamp or Duroc) the females(Gilts) would be eligible for breeding at 7-8 months of age.
You will enjoy the process more if you learn by doing with feeder pigs before proceeding to breeding and farrowing(birthing), Just my experience.
 

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Banjo Makin' Farmer Dad
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you - Up North. I'll check out that guide.

Your saying to keep my own boar. How long woud a boar be kept to do his job. Also, in the end is he still good for the freezer. I've even heard not to eat a non castrated pigs meat. I dont know I'm new I told ya.

I'm definatly open to sugestions about how to get started in to pigs. What were your first set ups like. (all members here - please reply if you have the time)
-#of pigs
-Ages of pigs
-Size of housing
-outdoor pens or not
-feed purchase. bags or wholesale.
I've even heard of pigs being raised on garbage. dont sound like what I'd be aiming for but dose it actualy happen.
 
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