Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this site the other day Tomato cloner and it got me to do some thinking. We graft fruit trees to get better fruit, why not the same with tomatoes? As an opition to saving tomato seed, Why not over-winter sections from your best tomato plant?

I'm not saying to replace saving seed but to use this as another option to keep your plants going year after year. Another tool to keep us going in the battle against genetic modification.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,549 Posts
I've done it when I lived in FL. LOL, it's very easy there with the weather. I never did all that aquaponics stuff on the site, I just rooted suckers or tips in plastic cups with a light, peaty, potting mix. Worked fine. I did find that cuttings from plants that had not begun to ripen fruit worked better then more mature plants. I had a friend who was better at it then I and she not only took cuttings but had a three-year-old tomato still producing. It does NOT work as well with determinate varieties. You can take a cutting of one and it will root and grow, but you need to be religious about pinching flowers because you'll have a little 8 inch plant determined to set one fruit and die.

If you pot up pepper plants and bring them in for the winter they do fine. Set them out when you put out your seedlings and they'll burst into bloom. The plants get really big and thick, the stems even get a little woody. Try it and see if you can resist calling your pet pepper plant Peter!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Otter. I grow det. and indem. I was thinking of trying to maintain cuttings of my best plants over the winter by sprouting roots and then once it is so tall, make a cutting again to keep it going until it got warm enough to set out.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,801 Posts
The logistics which go with it isn't worth the end result. Carrying over by cuttings is only practical for someone with a short or warm winter. Otherwise it would mean a lot of lighting and repeating the process several times during the course of a winter.

Tomatoes readily form their own roots from cuttings. Grafting would not be necessary in the system mentioned. Grafting tomatoes is often done in parts the SE where nematodes are a problem since there are a few varieties which are resistant.

Also, even cloning is no guarantee against genetic modification. Fully 5% of all tomato varieties are the result of a mutated gene. With so many chromosomes involved, there can be no 100% guarantee that there will never be a somatic change from even the most genetically established variety.

Martin
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top