alternative to gravel road?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Paul Wheaton, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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    I'm wondering if there is super hardy plant that I could grow on some of my roads that are used infrequently enough that gravel is not a smart option.

    Right now, these routes are muddy messes. We plant to put a proper crown on these roads a little later in the year when they aren't such a mess. There has been a lot of talk of gravel, but I would really like to plant some kind of durable plant instead.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    There are a group of ground covers called the "Stepables", and originally from a company in Salem Oregon.
    From what I have seen in the past, they are low very hardy to high traffic ground covers.
    There might be an nursery near you that carries them.

    note*
    OK,, just found the web site.
    http://www.stepables.com/
     

  3. babetteq

    babetteq Well-Known Member

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    hey thanks.. I just looked at the site too. I have some areas that could use a sturdy ground cover.

    babs
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are many persistant & long lasting grasses that will work IF:

    1. You take the time to get them established. They often are the most difficult things to get to grow. They will last alomst forever, but takes a year of babying them to get them started. Not sure where you drive for that year? :)

    2. You stay off the road when it is muddy. Nothing can live & grow if it is muddy & you leave tracks.


    Just good old cattle & horse hay makes up all my farm field roads. I cut 2 cuttings of hay off of them every year. Make good roads. BUT I try to stay off them when deep muddy, and they get seasonal traffic, with several months of no driving on them.

    --->Paul
     
  5. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think the best way to get something to grow is to try to keep it from growing. ;)

    But I'm going to check out that step-ables link. I have a couple spots in the suburban yard that could use some heavy-duty ground cover.

    Pony!
     
  6. randomguy

    randomguy Member

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    For foot traffic there are options, for automobile traffic there are not. While some very hardy ground covers may take some abuse from automobiles, it will be only a matter of time until the soil is to compacted from the weight of your automobiles for anything to really grow there. As you drive over an area over and over again your car acts like a steam roller gradually compacting the soil granolas until they get hard as rock. =(
     
  7. Steph in MT

    Steph in MT Well-Known Member

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    We're considering wood chips for a similar situation. Gotta do something with all those branches that are too small for the woodstove. :)
    Steph
     
  8. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Ah.. but those super Dandelions seem to never die, no matter what. :rolleyes:
    Is like the more you drive over them the bigger they get.
     
  9. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    wow, that's a good idea.