Alternative to a hot box

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Ross, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    This is a little warming "nest" I threw together as I don't like any hotboxes air quality managment I've seen. It needs a 250 watt bulb for the really cold days (-20s) but works great right now as we're closer to the freezing point. its just a lick tub with an inch of styrofoam in the bottom and hay on top, fenced off from the allyway. Its much better than toasting the ewes too.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. FairviewFarm

    FairviewFarm Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Here is another hot box option. These were recommended to Wisconsin shepherds several years ago. The written directions are as follows: "A cardboard box can be used as a temporary enclosure, or a permanent box can be constructed of plywood. The box must have a small opening so that the animal's head will stick out and breathe fresh, unheated air. A portable hair dryer is an excellent heat source. Cut a hole in the box to insert the nozzle of the hair dryer. The medium or low heat setting of the hair dryer will usually maintain the neat needed, but you should test this by hand to make sure that the heat is enough but not too hot. Turn, rub, exercise the legs, and take the animal's temperature about every 30 minutes. When the body temperature rises to 97-100 degrees F, force feed the animal and maintain heat until its temperature rises to normal." By Frank E. Woodson, DVM, West Virginia University

    I have also used a heating pad, as shown in the photo, once the lamb is dry. Lining the bottom of the box is a sheet of plastic (large garbage bag actually), then the heating pad if I'm going to use it and on top of that is an old bath towel or two. You can see the hole for the hair dryer. The lamb in this photo was dry at the point I thought to take a picture so is being warmed by the heating pad.

    Rather than force feeding the lamb before they're ready to suck naturally, I have had better success giving the lamb an intraperitoneal injection of solution of dextrose and lactated ringers that has been warmed along with a dose of vitamin B complex. If anyone is interested I can post the directions for the intraperitoneal injection.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    We do pretty much the same thing for feeding, wit an IP of 30% dextrose (not 50%) unless they can hold their head up. I'll tube feed before if I want the lamb to suck on mum because I found they were harder to start if they got a bottle first. Might just be my sheep though
     
  4. FairviewFarm

    FairviewFarm Well-Known Member

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    I didn't intend to give the impression that the IP solution is 50/50. The mix that I use for IP injection is:

    40 cc of Lacatated Ringers
    20 cc of 50% Dextrose

    which yields approximately a 20% dextrose solution. Quantity to administer is 4 cc per pound.

    The Vitamin B complex is at 1/2 cc per 10 pounds.

    Hardy agreement on stomach tubing them with colostrum as they imprint on that bottle nipple mighty quickly so not just your sheep.