Alternative Driveway Materials?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by SouthernThunder, Jun 2, 2004.

  1. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    Howdy yall! I live in Oklahoma and am currently building a log home that is about 1/2 mile deep in my property from the road nearest road. Needless to say, it would cost a small fortune to lay asphalt or concrete this distance. I have a path cleared and leveled but it is just dirt.

    All this log laying in my home construction got me thinking about the old time plank roads they used to have up north in the 1800's. I have plenty of timber... Well you can see where I am going with this. I was also thinking about trenching and laying railroad ties which I can get very very cheap.

    Anyway, I am looking for a cheap way to stablize my driveway so that its driveable in the rain in something like a camaro... Any wild ideas?
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't they have gravel down in Oklahoma? :)

    --->Paul
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Paul's right. Gravel is the best surface for the least money. If you don't want to lay out any more than nessesary, just put gravel where you have ruts showing up in wet weather. If you don't have ruts just drive on it like it is.
     
  4. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    my uncle lives 1/4 mile in the woods, he paid $1200 to get his drive rocked.

    I would start off with 1" or bigger rock and once the vehicles pounded that in then use 1/2" rock.

    BTW there is somthing they use in the Oilfields on the Lease roads, it's a protective tarp they lay down, and then put gravel on the top of it, and whenever the road sinks it is evenly distributed and it prevents ruts.

    Anyone know what you call that tarp material?
     
  5. owhn

    owhn Well-Known Member

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  6. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Go with the fabric under the gravel. I know of one place they went across a muck swamp and it worked wonders. Get rid of the Camaro and get a TRUCK!!!

    mikell
     
  7. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that geotextile option is pretty durn enticing. I have never been a big fan of gravel because of the maintinance invloved and the re-occurring cost of having it dissappear on you. I had considered rocking it because I have 15 acres of pasture I need to clear that has some monster rocks in it. Got some good options now... Thanks for the replies folks!

    (BTW, I do have a truck but not all of my visitors do. :waa: )
     
  8. OUVickie

    OUVickie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey fellow Okie,
    The roads where we live are clay and sand - pretty bad when we first moved to the sticks. They've started graveling all the county roads now and using something called Harjo (?). It's pretty rough at first but once it's driven on it lays down almost like asphalt, didn't seem to take long before it smoothed out either. It's made a huge difference out here on what used to be almost impassable roads.

    Makes me wonder now how it would work if you laid it over the geotextile? - hmmm have to look into that.
    Welcome to the forum! :D
    Vickie
     
  9. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    You're talking about a major undertaking to lay a plank road and the life would be short. Talk to your supervisor and see if he will dump some gravel at the entrance, also get a map that shows gravel pits, it might be that you have one near you, in my opinion gravel would be the way to go and if you can't do it all at one time, do the bad spots first. If you need culverts, the fiberglass ones they have now are strong, cheap and easy to install, a lot of farm stores carry them.
     
  10. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Geotextile fabrics, way cool
     
  11. OUVickie

    OUVickie Well-Known Member Supporter

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  12. tkrabec

    tkrabec Well-Known Member

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    we used washout from the concrete companies. It's cheap and it works really well. We did get alot of larger pieces of concrete bue we used those around our planters.

    -- Tim
     
  13. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Several of the concrete plants here use a rockcrusher to recyle waste concrete. It is cheap to buy and does an excellent job for building a road. You will be amazed at how the road holds up under very heavy traffic and it looks neat also as it has the appearance of crushed stone. I built a road over very rolling ground using this material more than 12 months ago and nearly daily it gets traveled by semi trucks delivering to or picking up from the layer house. To date we have not had to do any maintenace since completing the road. Call your ready mix plants and ask if they have any recyled washout or crushed concrete. $4 to $5 per ton is the price at the plant here.
     
  14. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    Caliche, however it is spelled, Ka-lee-chee.
     
  15. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

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  16. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ............I heard this somewhere. They now grindup all the old tires and mix with the asphalt they pave our hiways with. But, i believe you can buy the material and have it dumped and utilize for a country road. ...fordy... :eek: :)
     
  17. Kirk

    Kirk Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of shredded asphault being very cheap and it settles in to make a nice roadat way less cost than asphault.
    Kirk
     
  18. rider

    rider Well-Known Member

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    The recycled asphalt makes a great driveway and cheap, jsut spread it out and drive on it. It packs down over time and doesnt seem to break up too bad with normal use. Large trucks with heavy loads may do some damage. But I never had any problem with the drive way I had that was done with the recycle asphalt
     
  19. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Can you recycle used carpet? My last place to live in the hills, the landlord had old carpet he picked up for free. He put it on the ground around the house and it really made a difference. You could even gravel over it when you had more cash.
     
  20. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    I like carpet too, in sunny places it lets the grass grow into it and gives that old country drive look as the wear line from the tires are worn down, in low spots several layers with some gravel inbetween will stop the "ever increasing mud pit" cycle, as you try to drive around the deeper puddles.