Aging meat question

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by djuhnke, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. djuhnke

    djuhnke Well-Known Member

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    Maybe this question has already been posed. Can I butcher a pig, cut it into pieces & package and then let them age while packaged vs. letting the entire carcass hang? I do this for chickens and it works out well. Can I do this for the pigs?

    Dan
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    We cut in large pieces to age the meat since we don't have a place to let the carcass hang. After aging then we cut and wrap. This method works fine- I think yours would too but I've never tried it.
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Pork, unlike beef, doesn't improve with aging. Cut, wrap and freeze it.

    If you are aging any meat, it probably should be done on the carcass. The meat actually forms a sort of rind on it, protecting the interior.
     
  4. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Aging might be the wrong word. Since I don't work with beef, I forget beef is aged for two weeks at a time. I tend to use either word interchangeably. The carcass of a pig is chilled and it needs to be chilled due to bacterial growth and toughening of the meat. We chill our pork for at least 24 hours. Sometimes three days depending on my schedule and the size of the pig. I hope that clears it up. Sorry for the confusion.
     
  5. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I can not disagree enough with that. The meat is much more tender to me and the kids, and less "gamey" in flavor to my wife if aged. packages is fine 10 days in the fridge either before eating or freezing


     
  6. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    I know everyone does it different. :)
    In our case we age our beef and venison for days..... but we don't age our pork or poultry, we chill it for at least 24 hours before cutting and wrapping.

    I'm not saying this is the right way to do it..........it's just the way my family does it. :)
     
  7. djuhnke

    djuhnke Well-Known Member

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    Could I do the same thing with beef? Age it in the packages?

    Dan
     
  8. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    To be aged properly beef must be hung. If you package it and try to age it it will just soak in its own blood. Aging really only improves young, fat beef.
     
  9. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    If it has been gutted and decapitated, there is no or at least very little blood to puddle anywhere. If it has been cut up and packaged the story is the same. You are not talking about aging meat, you are talking about drying the meat, sometimes called dry-aging, hence the confusion. I age pork all the time, and have been doing this for years. I'd estimate conservatively 50 pigs. Aging (not dry aging typically used with beef) simply means storing the meat at a temperature low enough to prohibit bacterial growth, and high enough to not freeze. This allows some cellular brreakdown without rotting, thus tenderizing the meat. Get a thermometer and tweak the settings on your frigerator to get it to 35F and store the (packaged or covered) meat for 7-10 days prior to freezing or cooking