Aggressive sheep

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Rob30, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. Rob30

    Rob30 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am looking for an aggressive breed of sheep, for lamb production. I keep Boer cross goats. I recently bought some sheep. I keep them together. They seem to be doing ok. They rank about the same as the smaller yearling goats within the herd. They take the odd hit from the goats. The goats often strike the sheep and one another.
    Are dorper sheep more aggressive? I am looking into a dorper ram.
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    My Dorper ram, Sam, is aggressive. at times. Hes more aggressive towards people than to the other sheep but he makes pretty babies so Ive let him live so far LOL

    I think its more an individual thing than a breed trait though
    [​IMG]
     

  3. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    So...perhaps what you really want is a tough sheep that can hold it's own? Because to me, aggressive is mean, and I don't think you'd want a mean sheep... :shrug:
     
  4. Slev

    Slev Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oh just ask Kesoaps, I've had "loads" of experiance at hauling wet, mean sheep! You might consider Scottish Black Face, or North Country Cheviots....
     
  5. Somerhill

    Somerhill Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking about suggesting Scottish Blackfaced. We had them for a short time several years ago, and the were aggressive. Always fighting among themselves, and whacking away at the poor Cheviots. :rolleyes: Plus they have so much wool that it would cushion them from goat blows.
    Lisa at Somerhill
     
  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Rob in your neck of the woods there should be North County cheviots, and Suffolks in abundance. Both should be tough enough to put up with goats but they are a handful to handle. I got rid of mine because I was tired of the fight for every managment task.
     
  7. Goatsandsheep

    Goatsandsheep Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We run are suffolk, hampshire and dorset sheep with are boer goats. The only time anyones aggressive is feeding time. G&S
     
  8. Rob30

    Rob30 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I guess your right. A tough breed of sheep is what I am looking for.
    I will look into the cheviots. I have been told to stay clear of suffolks because they are expensive to keep. Large sheep eat alot. Also most suffolk have been bred for feed lots, and do not do as well on pasture. So I have been told.
    Dorpers are another breed I will look into.
    Basically I need a tough hardy easy care sheep, that produces lambs in abundance.
     
  9. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    "Basically I need a tough hardy easy care sheep, that produces lambs in abundance."

    Dorpers and Katahdins are like that
     
  10. Farmer Joe

    Farmer Joe Grass farmer

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    For tough sheep that need only pasture of hay, our Icelandics hold their own against our goats. Shearing twice a year can be a drawback if you don't have a market for the wool.
     
  11. Philip

    Philip Philip

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    Dorpers are good 'do-ers' but struggle with footrot if you have wet country. For that reason we have Wiltshires. Self-shedding like Dorpers, but can live on the smell of an oily rag and have good feet. We have the horned variety, but polled is more popular.
     
  12. Philip

    Philip Philip

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    Just had a look on a US website and I think what are called Wiltshire in New Zealand are known as Katahdin in the US ?
     
  13. MommaSasquatch

    MommaSasquatch Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, my Icelandic ewes beat up my dog. They don't take any nonsense from the goats either, but my goats are pretty mild-tempered.
     
  14. Hawkfamily

    Hawkfamily Well-Known Member

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    Our Suffolk ram is great with the goats - is HUGE, though, you are right! He does eat a lot - in the pasture seasons, it is fine. But, the winter sets us a back a few bucks. He produces wonderful babies. But, he is a toughy. I usually carry a rake around the farmyard with me, in case he catches me from behind when I'm not looking. lol
    Super handsome boy, though!! and I love his big lambs - they sell well!
    Jodi
     
  15. chicamarun

    chicamarun Well-Known Member

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    I have pasture-raised suffolk and dorset. I guess it depends on your pasture - because mine only get grain once in awhile if I need them to go to another pasture. But I love my guys (yeah my 'pet' wether is big - but a sweetheart) and my girls are wonderful to deal with - my dorsets well, they are still getting used to me (only been here 10 months so I guess they are slower <G>)

    I would go with sheep you "attach" to also - I liked the suffolk because I was able to work with them easily and I had a lot of local help if I needed it - whereas some of the other breeds are tougher to find and so the vet might not understand the breed as much. (if that makes any sense)
     
  16. chronic66

    chronic66 Well-Known Member

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    I've got a Barbado/Katahdin ram, almost two, great set of horns. Needs no shearing and thrives on whatever there is. Gave me a beautiful little barbado looking ewe, exactly like her mother. I really like the no shearing part. He held his own with the goats when I had them.
     
  17. hornless

    hornless Well-Known Member

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    you don't want to keep sheep with goats. goats need copper and sheep can't have it so they cant be kept together.
     
  18. LMonty

    LMonty Well-Known Member

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    if you use rumen boluses on the goats, they get plenty of copper and that makes it easy to mix them in pasture management- just put out the low copper minerals. they are pretty cheap and easy to use.
     
  19. MommaSasquatch

    MommaSasquatch Well-Known Member

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    Many people do keep them together, it just requires a little extra management to see to it that the goats get their copper. I haven't found that particularly difficult to accomplish.