Advice sought for rare goats' breeding

Discussion in 'Goats' started by AndreaNZ, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. AndreaNZ

    AndreaNZ Well-Known Member

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    Hi, all - have just acquired 22 of the 30 remaining of a rare goat breed here in NZ. One doe, who apparently was one of the originals captured from the "wild" where all the goats had been, has had mastitis with each and every kidding (3 so far in captivity over the last 3 years). The ligaments on her udder are completely shot, and one side of her udder nearly touches the ground. So, as a "progenitor" of a very rare heritage breed (a lot of people believe they go back - about 150 years - to the original Old English Goat - they do have quite nice dairy conformation for a feral goat and none of the other feral breeds exhibit "dairyness"), do we breed from her again and take our chances with the mastitis (and dry her off immediately after kidding) to get a few more of the breed on the ground, or just cull her now. None of her daughters has had mastitis (there are 4 or 5 who've kidded), and people seem to think that her udder troubles are from an injury received right after she was captured 3-4 years ago.

    Advice? :)

    Cheers
    Andrea
    NZ
     
  2. TwoAcresAndAGoat

    TwoAcresAndAGoat Well-Known Member

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    NC
    Depending on the deversity of the gene pool you may not want to loose her. With only 22 specimins I would think that every one is necessary.

    #1 the gene pool for the breed is so small
    #2 her daughters show no sign of the trate (how about granddaughters?)
    #3 strong indication the problem may be due to injury.

    Test breed - Line breed several of her daughters to some of her sons (sister to brother) if there is any adverse genetics going on it will show up. be prepared to cull the whole lot if a genetic problem occurs. ( of coure with such a small number of animals you may only have sisters and brothers)

    I would breed her with the objective to get more of the goats on the ground unless you have enough of her daughters, sisters etc. Does she have any confirmation charactistis you want to preserve that are not showing up strongly in the rest of the herd.

    You may want to coorespond with a zoo. Many have experience dealing with endangerd species. Don't cull her until you are absolutly sure you don't need her.
     

  3. AndreaNZ

    AndreaNZ Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that. This whole line-breeding thing is something I've only skimmed over till now, but must learn about and make use of to preserve these goats. There are 3 originals to my herd - 1 buck and 2 does, and all the offpsring are from these 3. She's one of the originals. There are a few other original does with another rare breed groupie in town, and we are going to get together soon to figure out how best to manage the breed and herds. We're both involved in the national rare breeds society, and I'm making contacts with them as well. The woman who had them before ran them all together and so didn't keep track of who bred whom after the first generation, and it's all sons and daughters and mothers and fathers all bred together for 3-4 years. They don't have a once-a-year breeding cycle; they're twice-yearly, in spring and autumn, so it's easy to see how 3 became so many in such a short time. Unfortunately, a number of very young does were also bred when they weren't even half grown.

    Cheers
    Andrea
    NZ
     
  4. greenacres

    greenacres Well-Known Member

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    You could also try flushing and implanting in recipient does.
     
  5. billooo2

    billooo2 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Another possibility......I know one breeder who had an exceptionally nice show doe that produced outstanding kids. She developed a very bad case of mastitis. They had her udder removed, and she continued to live for many years, and produced several beautiful babies. (Of course her babies were then bottle raised.)