Advice on Blindness

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Tango, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Florida
    Here is the deal:
    I was offered an Alpine dairy doe for $50. She is blind. The owner says that it was pinkeye she hadn't caught in time. A few days after I agreed to purchase, the owner called to tell me that the doe had taken a step back in health and that she wouldn't selll until the doe improved. The doe was treated with antibiotics and is once again doing well and seems to have improved somewhat to seing "shadows," perhaps. That is what the owner has told me. I've no problem with the owner- she has been very considerate and careful thoroughout the process. I don't think that she is trying to unload a sick goat on me. I can deal with a blind goat if that is all it is. I'm going there tomorrow to pick up a couple of boer goats and I'm a little concerned now that the dairy goat (in quarantine there) might spread something to my small herd here. She will be transported together with the boers since I have no other means of transportation. Honest opinons, please. Am I asking for trouble? Might there be mroe serious contagions that might not be evident?
     
  2. GoatTalkr9

    GoatTalkr9 Well-Known Member

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    Is she SURE it was pinkeye? I had 3 goats with goat polio last month and they went totally blind,then improved slowly to shadows...then eventually regained full sight.
     

  3. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Blind from pinkeye is rarely permanant. With a replapse in health, the problem here is likely chlyamydia pinkeye, which means she will also likely abort, or have weak kids born. If the boers have already had pinkeye this year, or have been with her before there is no harm in trailering them with her, unless they pick on her. Unless totoally resolved she is also contagious to your herd, as is her birth fluids when she does kid.

    She is severely stressed from the pinkeye and now the illness, add a move on top of this and you need to take pariticular attention to worms, cocci, and to make sure if she can't see to put her by herself in a small stall so she can find food and water and not hurt herself when frightened.

    I think it's a bad idea to purchase sick stock, although if I knew the doe from before and she was being sold with pinkeye I wouldn't bat an eye.

    Problem is unless the person is new and doesn't know that blindness from pinkeye is temporary, than no I wouldn't buy any 50$ goat. And I sort of have a bad taste in my mouth for the person selling her, if she is truly blind, say she had pinkeye along time ago and this is permanant, than how sad to now move her? You ruined her, you keep her, or put her down. I just can't believe unless sold as a single pet that a doe like this could have any quality of life, being blind, and not knowing the new folks, or the new place. Vicki
     
  4. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    Texas
    How sad. I think it is great that you would be willing to give her the time and love and attention that she will obviously need to have a happy life there with you. We had a blind calf one time. His name was hamburger and was raised for that very reason. He was blinded by fire ants. Great personality. Ran into stuff all the time, but bounced right back. Knew each one of our voices. Ate and drank well and figured out how to get by just as well as a seeing calf would have. I would think your doe being the social animals goats are would need a lot of comfort from you especially in the beginning. Lots of touching and talking. The separate pen would be a good idea if other goats are mean to her, otherwise she would probably be happier in their company. She can hear them and know where they are and hang with them. She will also learn your voice. We have a son who is totally deaf and believe me when one sense is gone the others make up for it. I would heed quarantine precautions for a couple weeks before introducing her into my herd. Can you have her checked by a vet before you decide to purchase her or move her to your place?
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Thank you for the replies.
    I am still worried. GT9 and Vickie I appreciate your posts. Vickie, chlamydia is what the owner suggested might be the cause. If it causes abortions I've no business getting her as a dairy goat to replace my Nubian. But mostly I am worried about my goats here and giving anyone, including my buck, an additional problem. MM I don't mind the blindness, it is the repercussions of a diease that I wouldn''t forgive myself for. Thanks for the replies....