advice needed on buck's poor feet

Discussion in 'Goats' started by dk_40207, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    I went to look at a nubian buck last night. The man who is boarding him has not touched his feet in a year. The buck has been on pasture--and we have had a horibbly wet year. His hooves were grown under all the way. When peeled back a bit--there looked to be signifcant rot under them.
    The poor guy was limping something awful! I actual thought he might fall down. I felt so sorry for him, as he seemed to also be in a great deal of pain. At least three of the feet look this way--I just didn't even want to see the other one:(
    I know I will not buy him at full price, and the owner understands this. My husband offered to go over and help the border trim up and treat his feet next weekend. I won't consider purchasing him until he seems to be walking better.
    Here is where the question comes in---the condition of his feet that I have described, I have never had to deal with. Is there anyone w/ footrot knowledge that can give me a reasonable assesment of his outlook? If we trim and treat, what do you think his chances are? He was a very tame, handlable, beautiful guy--so I want to give him a chance...
    whatda think?
     
  2. cdathey

    cdathey Member

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    I would bypass the buck but knowing if it was me I would probably take it on. You should see some of the motley crew we have acquired over the years. I surely wouldn't pay alot of money for him in that condition.

    Anyways I would keep him to himself in his own paddock until the feet are healed so no other goat gets it and I would worm him immediately. It will take a long time for his hooves to heal. I would trim away what you could on the hooves. We had a sheep like that w/ 1 bad hoof w/ maggots in it too. This was over the summer when we got her. I also used a spray from Tractor Supply that kills maggots on contact and is a wound spray. I intially tried wrapping the hoof which didn't work because it kept the area moist. Then when I left it unwrapped it started getting maggots in it. The hoof didn't really start to improve until I totally trimmed it back (it was bleeding and all when I did it... poor Dolly, I trimmed it back as far as I could go), hoof picked out the maggots and then sprayed it daily with the maggot killer/wound spray. I will look at the can when my husband gets back. The spray is in our tack bucket in our truck. I'll post what it is then. The stuff really helped and it was pretty cheap.
     

  3. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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  4. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    He'll recover with care and regular trimming. His pasterns and conformation might be less than ideal after this, but to be very honest, I've seen animals go for a few years without trimming and walk normally afterwards. I mean, it's a shame that it happened and all, but it isn't a BIG frigging deal. Trim him up a little at a time, say, a half inch every week, until he is back to where he shoudl be. Whatever you do, don't trim it all at once.
     
  5. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    okay. Thanks. I will make an offer on him(of course less then asking price w/ the care involved)and hopfully bring him home to begin his recovery:0
    Thanks! I'll post pics if he comes home..
     
  6. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    7% iodine will REALLY dry him out; my only concern is that the strength may be a bit too much for the soft tissues that may be exposed. However, I may be wrong. Last year we had sosososososososo much rain, that I ran my small group of boers through the barn once a week and just dipped in the iodine. They did well. Good luck!!!!
     
  7. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    7% iodine solution is very strong . . . but with a serious infection in progress, I'd use hi strength ANYTHING until I saw the acute infection was definitely improving. Then, as Jcran said, 7% applied daily would be overkill.

    Solutions like betadine, iodine, H2O2, etc, are best diluted way down to treat a HEALING wound. These solutions not only kill bugs/bacteria, they also kill new healthy tissue cells. That's fine if you're just trying to get an infection under control. Once under control, then worry about diluting the iodine for "maintinence", i.e., a twice daily dip and cleaning of debris.

    When we'd get a bad diabetic foot wound in the hospital, we didn't worry about killing new healthy tissue until the infection had backed off.

    A great, super cheap antibacterial solution is a tbsp of bleach in a gallon of clean water. It prevents further growth of bacteria and does not inhibit healthy new tissue growth.

    All my goats had terrible hooves when I got them. It took three weeks of daily clipping (I hadn't done it before, so . . . ) to get those hooves looking good. It was high summer, very dry when I got them, so luckily, foot rot didn't make it's appearance.
     
  8. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    It's actually very common to see bucks in disrepair like that even in homes where his daughters are top show stock. Bucks sadly get the last of everything at alot of places.

    I have brokered herds going out of business and have dealt with alot of overgrown hooves. In the condition you are talking about the best thing to do is to grind them down. Attach the buck to a fence tied high with his head up, I have also had to use a belly tie to tie them to the fence to keep them over at thef ence and not walking on me. My husband puts on his welding gloves and holds a belt sander with thick grit paper on it, upside down, and I press the hoof against it. Usually after 30 seconds, the bottom of the sole is soo loose, I can pare off all the overlaped stuff. It is going to stink something awful from all the trapped bacteria and manure in the fold over. Keep pressing the foot onto the grinder, taking special care to press flat, until you see some blood. The belt sander does a great job because it keeps his feet flat, but also is hot and cauterizes off any small bleeders.

    Give him a tetanus antitoxin shot, and do CD&T shots every 21 days, give him a good worming, put him on an appropriate mineral with high copper in it. Coopertox and other high copper sulfate foot bathes work very well for hardening the hooves after prolonged neglect like this, because they are copper, what he is lacking.

    Don't pass up a good bloodline from neglect, you could have him back in excellent shape by spring, certainly by breeding season next year. If you can swing it I know folks who rave about the buck minerals sold on the internet (think it's Hoeggers called buck power?)

    Very unlikely he has true hoof rot, the bacterial form that cows get, so he likely won't need antibiotics unless he runs fever. 1cc per 100 pounds IM of Banamine if you can get it from your vet will take the edge off the pain, but he is going to limp...but he is limping now. Be agressive, get it down now, don't kitty foot around and trim him a little today, a little in a couple of weeks, then he will be limping for a month!

    Make diet changes slowly, make sure if you are going tograin him you use ammonium chloride or a meat goat pellet with it already in it. Vicki
     
  9. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As usual, Vickie has given you great advice.

    I'd add: trim off the loose side wall up to the point where it is well attached. If you don't, he's going to continue to get manure up in there, and the cycle of rotting/detaching the hoof wall will continue. I second the Coppertox dips. Of course, put him on dry ground. expecially a good rough surface to help wear down the hooves and toughen them up.

    Sadly, it does seem like the bucks get neglected more than does. They smell, some folks are afraid of them, they are off by themselves and easier to overlook, yadda, yadda. Seems to me they should be treated as well or better than the rest of the herd, as a fine buck is expensive, and his genetics are half the herd.
     
  10. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    Well, we are getting him----for free:) I made a low ball offer and offered to help get him back into shape even if we didn't buy him. Alo getting the does I mentioned in another thread--also free:) They are moving--leaving tomorrow for another state....so I'll give them a good home.
    Thanks!
     
  11. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    I must say, my does right now are due for a cycle of trimming; my buck's feet look "ok" but I'd be much more likely to let him go a bit longer as he is sooooo covered in urine and stink right now. I have a special pair of gloves I use when I trim him. Then I scrub my happy little hands and coat them in a good stink lotion.
     
  12. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ummmm, I'd go for it too!!! Good luck with them all. What are the bloodlines on the buck if you don't mind me asking..... :)
     
  13. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    Wish I knew! He was just a "family milk buck". I would *like to think* that someone kept him for a good reason:) I guess I'll have to just see what we get from him..... If he's not a great buck--at least he'll keep our girls in milk until we can afford some great bloodlines...I'll post pics soon. Thanks everyone:)
     
  14. PygmyLover

    PygmyLover nigerian & pygmy breeder

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    well I think that is awesome. And bloodlines mean nothing to me! I keep goats for pets and for a little profet. I am glad you are getting such a friendly buck. I hope all goes well for you and his recovery.