Advice for Germany?

Discussion in 'Home Defense/Guns' started by posifour11, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. posifour11

    posifour11 Well-Known Member

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    i leave saturday for 3 weeks in germany as my annual training this year. i have already recieved the general warnings, "do what the police say, they don't have to put up with it like here" etc.

    does anyone know about kaiserslautern or the surrounding area?

    thanks!!
     
  2. Vera

    Vera Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what has changed since I left, but generally, I'd say that you'll be fine as long as you just behave like a guest in a stranger's house (which is basically what you will be). Observe what the locals do to see what's acceptable and what isn't... I don't think you'll have a whole lot of time to spend off post if you're only there for 3 weeks, but when you go to Rome... you know.

    The one thing I remember more than anything that was so aggravating was the disrespect Americans displayed in our churches. Tourists and soldiers alike, they'd wander on in even during a service and jabber about the windows or exclaim to each other about some carving, sort of as if it was Disneyland. Not a good thing to do. Faith is taken a lot more seriously over there than here.

    If you want to make brownie points with Germans, you can try to learn a few phrases and use them when you go into a small shop to buy something. Everybody there knows English, but it's good manners to at least try to speak the language of your host country. Addressing people in their country in your language without trying to "do as the Romans do" is a little arrogant and comes across as rude.

    As for the police, they have authority and yes, you should do as you're told, but it's important to know that their job truly is to "protect and serve". You'd be hard pressed to find a Sandbox Rambo on a power trip who'll require you to sit in your car and keep your hands on the steering wheel until he allows you to move - slowly. If the police tell you to do something or not to do something, they have a good reason for it and it'll be to everybody's benefit and nobody's harm to follow their directions.

    Uh, one note on driving... it's a thrill, but unless you know how to drive fast, don't get carried away, ok? There's a lot more to high speed driving than putting the pedal to the metal, like being 100% focused and paying meticulous attention every second you're on the road. However, if there's a way you can hook up with a German who'll let you come along for a drive, go for it - if your bladder doesn't give out, you'll have the thrill of your life :)
     

  3. alabamared

    alabamared Well-Known Member

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    I lived in Nurnberg for 32 months while in the Army. It was over 10 years ago.
    If you have time for sight seeing, get a book for that area.
    Make sure you stay out of the areas that are off-limits.
    Always go out with a buddy or buddies.
    Drink some of their good beer. But watch out it is much stronger than ours.
    Lots of good food too.
    Eine bier, bitte. That's all the Deutsch you need to know.
    When I was on the bus, going to my first duty station, I kept seeing signs on the Autobahn that read Ausfahrt. I thought that must be a really big town. Later I found out it meant Exit. That is still funny to me.
    If you get the chance, see some of the local sites.
    Red
     
  4. Vera

    Vera Well-Known Member

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    If you don't mind sounding like a Turk. Try "Ein Bier, bitte" and you'll be perceived as a rare educated American :)
     
  5. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    One of the most prized possessions from my trip in '03 to Germany is a coffee mug that reads, "Where the heck is Ausfarht Germany, anyway?". Unfortunately, despite being blonde I picked up on Ausfarht und Einfarht very quickly. lol The most disturbing part of the process was when entering a base and having to stand in freezing weather while the German securitas checked our car for explosives and being watched by basically children with automatic guns!! Oh, and then there was the wonderbra hotel....or was that wunderbar? lol We were fortunate enough to be able to visit the Nurnberg Christkindles Markt while there as well. It was an outstanding trip. I'm actually not contributing anything to this thread other than to ramble...sorry. I was lost darn near the entire time we were there so I couldn't tell you what is where other than Dachau is down south near the Alps as is Munchen und Garmisch is in the Alps. Enjoy your time there, it's such a beautiful place!!
     
  6. alabamared

    alabamared Well-Known Member

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    I know how much the Germans hate the Turks. I had a friend almost killed by them because they thought he was Turkish. Since I am neither Turk nor educated, I didn't care as long as they brought the beer. Gruss Gott.
    Red
     
  7. KindredCanuck

    KindredCanuck In Remembrance

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    Just stay safe Posifour..

    KC~
     
  8. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    My parents went to Germany: they had a wonderfull time. But, then, they are ALWAYS polite! They were amazed at how many Americans would behave badly.

    Oh, actually not that MANY were badly behaved, but, an American who has a noisy fit because the place he is eating in does not know what ketsup is should perhaps stay home.

    When they were traveling, they said that lunch in a restauraunt is a relaxed, long drawn out affair. To allow more time for sightseeing, they started buying bread, cheese, sausages and such for lunch instead. They said that was far better than what you would find in America.