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Can you maybe do a pocket door?
Bedroom on one side, and a pretty narrow hallway that the bathroom opens into. Even to enlarge the current doorway would require removing support uprights (can't remember what they are called now, the vertical boards that run from floor to ceiling) and reframing the whole door. A larger door opening inward isn't the problem, it's the whole framework around the opening.
 

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Bedroom on one side, and a pretty narrow hallway that the bathroom opens into. Even to enlarge the current doorway would require removing support uprights (can't remember what they are called now, the vertical boards that run from floor to ceiling) and reframing the whole door. A larger door opening inward isn't the problem, it's the whole framework around the opening.
If it is a load bearing wall (runs 90 degrees to ceiling joists), that can be remedied. If it is a non load bearing wall removing the wall studs is a simple exercise that Mr Danaus can likely handle. Mr. Reynolds can explain it better than I can.
 
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Studs! I have no idea why that was eluding me!

Yes, it is a load bearing wall. Hubby is not a carpenter but can do remodeling work if necessary. We have books showing the proper way to frame a door and it doesn't look to be too difficult. Just cutting studs, reframing the new door, moving electrical service and installing a new door. Unfortunately it's one of those projects that have to wait until he has the free time to get it done.

I just didn't realize how narrow that door is until reading this thread.
 

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Studs! I have no idea why that was eluding me!

Yes, it is a load bearing wall. Hubby is not a carpenter but can do remodeling work if necessary. We have books showing the proper way to frame a door and it doesn't look to be too difficult. Just cutting studs, reframing the new door, moving electrical service and installing a new door. Unfortunately it's one of those projects that have to wait until he has the free time to get it done.

I just didn't realize how narrow that door is until reading this thread.
If you have the actual room to fit the door in the space there is hope. A 2x6 header is fine for a 3鈦 door (36") for a single story load bearing door. If 2 story go with a 2x12 header. The 2x12 may be overkill but I don't know what you have for load up stairs. You have to figure for live load instead of dead load on something like that. As a general rule roof and single story is dead load and second story is live load. You never know when someone will put a water bed, gun safe or pool table up there. Generally of course. There are always exceptions.

I have taken engineering but don't have a stamp. I realized that was not my thing as I like to be outdoors more than in. Kinda wasted (but not really) time going to school.

Anyway, it can be done one way or the other of you have room to install it. Problem I have seen is that architects don't often make the room for them.
 

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Single story with basement. Right now there are 2 2x4" headers over it, but only one side is resting on 2 2x4" studs, the other side is on only a single framing stud. We would have to cut one support stud but there is room for a larger door frame. Can't go the other way because of the wall between rooms. We can't do framing pieces wider than 4 inches unless we make the door deeper, the wall studs are only 4 inches wide.

I would take pictures but I haven't cleaned off the cobwebs for a month or so.
 

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Pocket door suck , it鈥檚 a great idea and I will do them but I want 2 2 2x4 walls on each side with giggle room , the tracks are ok .
But with the skinny frame I end up having to adjust them all the time.
I was adjusting one set for 20 years.
It would swell in the summer and shrink in the winter .
Then the dry wall guys allways screw the door thru the wall so it Dosent move.
I do barn doors they are good for a wheel chair and slide out of the way .
I do make the halls 42 to 48鈥 if there is room
I make the doors custom , this one is 6鈥 taller and 42 1/2鈥 wide
I mill the lumber and let it dry this one is made of poplar I ran out of lumber and there are some made of oak and ash supper heavy
94064
 

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I am making renovation in my house, I didn't even imagine how difficult is this task. However, the internet is full of blogs, videos, and other helpful information. By the way, I can recommend one of my favorite blogs, I am sure it's useful for many. Just check it out woodyexpert.com/best-wood-glue
 

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I would give you three basic tips that will help you build your dream home. First: do not neglect the facade. The facade is a reflection of the soul of the house, setting the mood for its owner. It's like in one joke. Why are Russians so harsh and angry? Because they live in boxes! The joke is not funny, but I think the essence is clear to you... The second is to be sure to build away from major cities so that you can enjoy the real American silence. And the third thing is to approach the selection of scaffolding responsibly. Your life may depend on it. When I was building my house, I used this service: Find The Best Scaffolding Services - Pete Suen Good luck!
 

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Do outswings on your bathroom doors if you are worried about keeling over while brushing your teeth. Nothing worse than blocking the door with your limp body so that people can't get in to help you.
 

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Right now we are doing some building. It is so hard me following the instructions of go watch TV and get out of the way. LOL

big rockpile
 

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I agree. Why would I front material on a 35,000 dollar deck? 10,000 in materials and then not get paid.

I usually get all materials for the current scope and some labor.

I know a few really successful guys who don't get deposits, but I'm not that flush.

I usually even get a deposit on small jobs. Nothing like special ordering an item and the customer changes thier mind and now I have a 200 dollar paperweight sitting in the shop.

My plumber just got stuck with probably 600 bucks in fixtures that the customer changed their mind on and won't pay for.

Skin in the game goes both ways.

I will say never pay 100 percent up front. Either the entire job, or the first milestone.

I've been paid 100 percent up front before. I'm an honest guy, but it can make it hard to be motivated.
 
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