Adding stalls to barn with concrete floor. Suggestions?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by homebirtha, Jan 14, 2007.

  1. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,259
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Location:
    Maryland
    This seems like it should be really easy, but we're having trouble coming up with a solution.

    We want to add a loafing area and some small stalls to our concrete-floor barn. We're planning to use cattle panels for the walls, but can't figure out how to secure them to the concrete floor. This is a clearspan hoop style barn, so no "real" walls to attach it to. How do we keep the panels upright and secure enough for goats to lean on?
     
  2. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,150
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Location:
    East-Central Ontario
    Unless you want to break up some concrete to put the posts down, you'll need to make a frame up overhead to tie them into each other. Then you can just make some tabs at the bottoms of the uprights and fasten them down with concrete anchors and have the tops of the uprights tied in to the stall on either side.
     

  3. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,314
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Location:
    NW OR
    Use free standing pens. Four panels attach to each other, like fair pens. Don't fasten them to the walls. You can make your own panels or buy them ready made ($$$) through a livestock supply.
     
  4. Snakeoil

    Snakeoil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    197
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Location:
    Iowa
    Concrete anchor bolts will work.
     
  5. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,259
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Location:
    Maryland
    Dale, when you say frame and uprights, what would you suggest using? Just dimensional framing lumber with regular concrete anchors in the wood?

    Doc, thanks for the suggestion. I'm hoping to do this cheap, and we already have some cattle panel, so I'd rather not have to buy the more expensive solid welded panels for freestanding stalls, if we can rig something.
     
  6. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,177
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    What type of stalls ? If its for horses I would not use cattle panels they are not strong enough and you can be sure they will get a hoof stuck.

    When we made our horse stalls we anchored them into the concrete by drilling first.

    Patty
     
  7. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    15,981
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan's thumb
    She said it's for goats. I would put a sealant on the floor if you don't already have it sealed.
     
  8. mdharris68

    mdharris68 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    502
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Location:
    NE Kansas
    Be sure to keep eye on the moisture from the goats. Our kidding stalls that were inside on concrete were constantly getting moist and had to change bedding a little to often. :baby04:
     
  9. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    The cattle panels will bend easily unless you put a frame around the outside of them such as 2x4s or pipe. Then fasten them together at the corners. They don't need to be fastened to the floor. This way they can be moved easily to clean out the pens, or rearrange the pens to different sizes.
     
  10. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,177
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    Oops missed the goat part . I would drill , you can use a cement bit in your normal drill. Use L shaped brackets and 4x4 or 6x 6;s attached into the concrete. We attached ours to the concrete and then to the rafters up above. The horses have not budged them. So i think attaching at the bottom and then maybe making a wooden frame would do fine.

    Patty
     
  11. Snafu177

    Snafu177 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Location:
    NW Ohio
    Brackets and Tapcons.
     
  12. Old Vet

    Old Vet In Remembrance

    Messages:
    11,515
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I wouold use a Hilti gun and nail the boards to the concrete. Use treated wood. The hilty gun cost about 20 dolrs and you might need it in somether project. It uses a blank .22 roud and sets the nail in concrete or steel.
     
  13. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,333
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
    .....................You can either rent or purchase a 1\2 inch Hammer Drill at home depot or lowes . Purchase the cement bits and you can use pieces of angle iron to fasten your wooden posts too . It's not expensive , just takes alittle work and planning to make it come out real strong and nice . Then , if you want to put the floor back like it was just use a grinder and remove the anchor bolts and grind them down flush with the floor / fordy... :)
     
  14. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

    Messages:
    2,053
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Location:
    KY
    What He said...

    That's what hammer drills and anchor bolts are for...

    Fordy has explained exactly the way I would do it...(Angle Iron on each opposing side of the post and lag-screwed into the wood)

    Also, look into some stall mats, heavy rubber mats to cushion the horse's feet.
     
  15. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,150
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Location:
    East-Central Ontario

    Yep. I'd use 2x4s if you can get rough lumber, 2x6 if you're getting it from the store. I wouldn't use pressure treated. Just anchor down front and back of the 2x6 going up at each end and use 2x4 across the front and back at the top and from front to back above the cattle panel.
     
  16. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

    Messages:
    7,380
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2003
    Location:
    east ont canada
    any reason you are making the penning permanent? our lambing pens,creep feeders and holding pens all are temp set up so we can clean out with a tractor or skidsteer. as you get older fork work tends too lose its thrill! our tarp barn has 5 foot side walls but have seen them use heavy gates too make a barrier between the tarp and the interior pens. one guy even made his own wood laminate trusses!
     
  17. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,259
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Location:
    Maryland
    I'm liking the angle iron plan. It sounds fairly easy and inexpensive. We already have a hammer drill and concrete bits. It was the anchoring part we were having trouble figuring out.

    Ford major, I like the idea of movable pens, but I think it would get pretty pricey. I figure with cattle panels, it's still fairly movable. We'd just have to cut the bolts that are in the concrete. Plus, at this point, we don't have a skidsteer or loader. Cleaning out after goats isn't that bad a job to do by hand.

    Thanks everyone for the input.
     
  18. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,787
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Location:
    IL, right smack dab in the middle
    LOL this answer seems to be going around today,
    You could drill the floor and install a pipe the bigger and heaver the pipe the stronger it would be .Id go all the way thru the concrete and pound the pipe into the dirt below till it was firm.. but still removable for cleaning.
     
  19. Hammer4

    Hammer4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    486
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri