Adding eggs of protien.

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by stanb999, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    Why do so many add milk to the feed and their is never the mention to add eggs. With the right girls you can get an egg for about 2 .oz of grain a day. So with 1 pound of grain you can get about 8 eggs. The eggs are quite high in protien and pigs love them. That one pound of grain will cost about 6 cents.

    With the cost of a balanced ration at 11 to 12 cents And the cost of grain at 6 cents. Would it not make sense to feed the pig 4 lbs of grain and 1 pound of eggs (8 large). So the cost of the feed 5 lbs would be about 30 cents instead of the common price of 55 cents.

    So in the raiseing of a hog the requirement of approx. 700 lbs of food. the savings could be quite high.
    700 lbs X .11 = 77.00 dollars.
    700 lbs X .6 = 42.00 dollars.
     
  2. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Stan, I think if you extended the equation you will find that you are money ahead selling the eggs and using the money to buy a cheaper source of protien.
     

  3. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    In my particular situation it's easy. I have a dairy farm. I have excess milk that would otherwise have to be dumped if I didn't have some pigs to feed it to. Now if somebody could have a talk with my young hens.....I keep waiting for somebody to lay an egg and I just haven't found any yet. :shrug:

    Heather
     
  4. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    I don't disagree with this statement. But the fact is if you don't have a large amount of chickens you can't really have reliable sales. Now that said. With say 20 chickens you could have all the eggs for you and maybe two pigs. The real benefit comes in the spring/summer when the chicken free range and the eggs cost almost nothing.
     
  5. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oh, I agree stan, I'm just pointing out why the practice is probably less common. In my own case, my birds pretty much shut down in the winter so I freeze my excess in the summer.
     
  6. arcticow

    arcticow Well-Known Member

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    Heather, you need to put up a KFC poster in your hen house!!!
     
  7. Rogo

    Rogo Well-Known Member

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    Many of us have birds that lay and hatch all year around with no added light. I don't sell eggs. I feed all excess eggs raw and whole to the birds for the animal protein. Many feed the eggs to their other critters also, including the pigs, at least around here. My dog likes her DE with a raw egg and when raising table pigs, they also get them.
     
  8. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    I like to use soft scrambled eggs in milk to feed runts or orphans. They seem to thrive on it. :)
     
  9. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    If they only knew they are skating on thin ice already. I originally bought all of these birds for the freezer. Once the hens grew up they looked so nice I thought I would keep them for layers. I miss fresh eggs and didn't have any laying hens. As it is the roosters are getting a temporary reprieve. We just butchered a steer and a pig so my freezers are full.

    Heather
     
  10. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

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    I feed eggs. Actually I feed cooked eggs back to my hens too. My pigs were greatful consumers of between 3 & 8 'dirty' eggs each per day.

    The man I get my pigs from lent me an older book on raising hogs, and it says 12 eggs per day meets protein requirements for growing pigs.

    This is just food for thought, by no means am I a pig nutritionist!
     
  11. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    I do add a dozen eggs two or three times per week to our pigs rations. I realize that's not enough protein by themselves, but they also get a pig mix ration. They sure look healthy enough, have plenty of energy, and enjoy the privilege of rooting around on about an acre and a half of lightly wooded field that "had" acorns on it.
     
  12. highlands

    highlands Well-Known Member

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    It is a matter of what we have in excess. Occasionally we have eggs but not enough to discuss. Milk and cheese is something that is available in excess. Whey is even more regular. Bread at times too. Eggs only rarely. When we do have excess eggs I feed them to the weaner piglets to increase their protein intake.

    Cheers,

    -Walter
    Sugar Mtn Farm
    in Vermont
     
  13. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    We give the eggs back to the chickens or to the pigs. Using them as a primary protein source would be very labor intensive. Highlands is right though, you don't hear much discussion because most people don't have them in excess. Most of our eggs get eaten by people. I've heard that they are great for training purposes though. Pigs that are accustomed to them will jump through hoops to get them.

    Husband o'G
     
  14. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    It takes more than grain to keep a hen laying: they need protien as well. The cheapest I have EVER produced eggs was 25 cents a dozen, during a cicada population explosion.

    It usually costs twice that.

    I have ALSO thought about using eggs for pigs, but alas I cannot. I am not zoned for pigs. (Sigh)
     
  15. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    I was talking of using the bonus eggs in summer. The ladies "free range" in summer also. The feed we give goes to almost nothing. We have a dozen sexlink hens. In the late spring/summer/Early fall they eat about 3 bags of feed total or about 25 dollars worth for 7 months. In this time they lay about 10 a day or 2100 eggs. so the cost per dozen is 14 cents. Not too shabby.

    In winter I wouldn't use eggs as they are more expensive. I only get 7 a day and it costs 8 bucks a month to feed them or .45 a dozen.

    But I get feeder pigs in the summer so the higher price in winter really isn't an issue.