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My husband and I have a piece of property that we've put a double-wide on. It's all electric and costing us a small fortune to upkeep. We're considering adding a wood burning stove to a room that has no chimney or anything else. Has anyone added one to a mobile home? What do we need to know before we get started? How did you make it a safe alternative to electric heat?

Thanks in advance,
Penny
 

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BasicLiving said:
My husband and I have a piece of property that we've put a double-wide on. It's all electric and costing us a small fortune to upkeep. We're considering adding a wood burning stove to a room that has no chimney or anything else. Has anyone added one to a mobile home? What do we need to know before we get started? How did you make it a safe alternative to electric heat?

Thanks in advance,
Penny
Talk to your insurance company first. Many will not insure mobiles with wood stoves, even if they are in an addition. We want to put a wood stove in our mobile, but we are having to find an insurance company that will allow it and have not been successful yet. Even so the premium will go up considerably.

donsgal
 

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It's all about the language. Pull the axles out from under it and it is now a modular home, not a mobile home. We put a wood stove in my brothers double wide a few years ago. We had to buy a new stove with all the paper work with it and use metalbestos pipe for the chimney. We put in a fake harth and mantle by framing up masonry board and laying a stone fasade over it. Insurance man came out and inspected it and it was good to go. I also put in a full masonry chimney in my house and a wood stove and it was the same deal with the insurance.
 

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before I went to an owb, I heated my mobile home with woodstoves. One is in an addition in a full basement, the other resided in the livingroom. As someone else stated, pull the axles and tougne if its still there, and they classify it differently. I installed a metalbestos chimney for the livingroom stove, and picked up a free homesteader wood/coal unit. Its surrounded by louvered tin, so the surround is much less hot than the cast iron on the stove itself. Worked great for 15 years, and would still work if it were still hooked up. Got an owb now, heating the house, shop and making my domestic hot water as I type. Don't let an insurance company jerk you around, If they say they can't insure you, find someone who will.
 

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I'm in the process of installing my woodstove in my doublewide. Doublewides are sold regularly with firplaces preinstalled in them so don't let the "you can't do that" people convince you otherwise. The biggest thing to keep in mind is safety and doing it right. I built a hearth by framing with metal lumber and attaching hardieboard and then rock. This protects all combutible surfaces and gives you the clearances necessary. Then use a good metal chimney system. A wood staove is less dangerous that a gas furnace yet most are scared of a wood fire in their house.
 

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The ideas listed here are required for ANY woodstove installation, in ANY type of dwelling, no exceptions. Follow the woodstove manufacure's installation instructons exactly, along with ALL Code requirements -- NO exceptions. This is from another post.

We have an 82.5% efficient catalytic wood stove which seems to burn most of the creosote before it gets to the flue. And we burn full hot every so often, and have 2-1/2" high-temperature insulated double stainless steel modern flue. Just in case someone was going to comment about how pine and spruce produce creosote.

Just love the smell of Pine burning!


Flue needs to extend 2' above roof.


This package shows all the things you need to be safe.


An insulated flue, and double wall Stainless steel is a type A flue, and what is required for wood heat, we used an 8" ID flue, with 2-1/2" high temperature insulation all around.


The double wall air insulated steel flue is below the ceiling flue support thimble at the top. Our wood stove is a catalytic Blaze King, 82.5% efficient (you will burn 17.9% less wood, and longer than with a standared air tight)


Finally you need to protect the floor from all those sparks.

Alex
 

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Hey Alex,
What brand is your chimney? I spoke to Selkirk today about their chimneys.
 

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Selkirk, is good. Can't remember the name of our chimney manufacture, but Home Hardware in Canada sells them. I will check it out and get back to you.

Alex
 

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If you are out in the country a bit. I would skip the wood stove and the furnace. Go with a wood boiler.

They work great and are much cheaper then gas.

You do have to throw some wood in them once a day or twice a day in the real cold times.
 

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From the pics posted looks like most of the heat would excape via the chimney. The idea should be to keep the heat around as long as posible, not let it float out the top of the home. Fire places and wood stoves look great, but you need to make them work great as well.

ADDING A HEAT RETAINER is worth it.
 

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daytrader,

It does look that way. But, no, the heat does not float away.

There is a manual damper which I put into the down position after the flue and catalytic converter reach the operating temperature. The air is shut off with a damper on the inlet air, which is controlled by a bimetallic spring which senses the room temperature and adjusts the inlet air automatically.

82.5% efficient means A LOT LESS heat and products of combustion go up the chimney. OH Well . . . Good Luck, All the best,

Alex
 

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Alex said:
Selkirk, is good. Can't remember the name of our chimney manufacture, but Home Hardware in Canada sells them. I will check it out and get back to you.

Alex
Sentinel is (or was) another decent chimney
 

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There are some downsides to the outdoor wood boiler. If you lose your power, you lose your heat. I am told they smoke and pollute more since the wood is burned at a lower temp because the water jacket cools the firebox. Less efficient use of the heat since some is lost in transfer to the house.
Advantages are many. No tracking wood in the house. Can burn about anything. Can heat hot water. No fire hazard. Don't need a chimney sweep.
I do not have a wood boiler but have looked at them. Those of you using them-feel free to comment or disagree.

If I build again, may put one in.
 

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The out door wood boilers smoke when WET wood is used. Many folks with them will burn green wood.

If you use good dry hard woods. There is almost no smoke.
 

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Country Doc said:
There are some downsides to the outdoor wood boiler. If you lose your power, you lose your heat. I am told they smoke and pollute more since the wood is burned at a lower temp because the water jacket cools the firebox. Less efficient use of the heat since some is lost in transfer to the house.
Advantages are many. No tracking wood in the house. Can burn about anything. Can heat hot water. No fire hazard. Don't need a chimney sweep.
I do not have a wood boiler but have looked at them. Those of you using them-feel free to comment or disagree.

If I build again, may put one in.
I'll address one at a time:
1) If you lose power, and you have planned ahead as any good homesteader would, you have a generator to at least run the boiler and any blowers or circulators. At least I planned ahead and have done this.

2) As someone else stated , they smoke when green or wet wood is used. Use good dry wood, it doesn't matter if its pine, or a hardwood, if its dry, it doesn't smoke anymore than a woodstove, as a matter of fact mine produces less smoke than the 2 woodstoves it used to take to keep me warm.

3) less efficient heat? Well I don't see it. The pipes are well insulated and buried at least 2 feet deep, 3 is better. I heat 2 buildings and am 24/7 /365 making hot water. Is there heat loss, sure there must be, BUT, everyroom is warm in my home, the same temperature even. Its not 90 in the livingroom where the stove used to be, and 55 in the bedroom at the oposit end of the house. Now THATS inefficient heat right there.

4) advantages..too many to list, you got a good start. One big one is, everyone wants to give you free firewood. I have 10 free cord for this year and 5 free cords drying for next year and its only august. All the free wood was already chunked up, I didn't even need to run a saw, just pick it up.
 
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