Acreage

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by CODIACRCMP, May 12, 2005.

  1. CODIACRCMP

    CODIACRCMP Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2005
    Location:
    Moncton, NB, Canada
    I paid $10,000 for 15 acres. Thats roughly $667.00 an acre. Then I noticed that some people are paying $4500.00 an acre. Is there that big of a price increase from Canada to America?

    The other thing is I know is I have 15 acres (500 feet x 1500 feet +/- )
    Is that big or small. I can't figure out just how big it is because its all trees and a creek.

    Danny
     
  2. boxwoods

    boxwoods Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    530
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Location:
    Central New York
    that's a nice size property
    500 across the front is good

    price sounds okay if you like Canada :)
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Location:
    Ontario
    Danny land in my neck of the woods runs $4500 easily. It would have to be tile drained and easily worked (not in small piddly fields like mine) What drives price is the ability to support crops (fertility and heat units) its closeness to market (for the crop grown) and future potential development. Moncton is not a grand metropolis, isn't a huge market for ag crops, and your land isn't the sort that fetches prime agland dollars.
     
  4. wizzard

    wizzard future nomad

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Location:
    ky
    ive been finding a bit of land out west for $200 per acre, but it has no trees and little irrigation. i would much rather buy 40 acres of woods, but the price on something like that is much higher, round 2000 per acre
     
  5. KindredCanuck

    KindredCanuck In Remembrance

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    Location:
    Greatest country in the world... CANADA
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Location:
    Kansas
    The closer you are to a large city, the higher the land prices are.

    There are 3 reasons for this. One reason is that so many of us who buy land need a paying job. Such jobs are easy to find near a city.

    The OTHER reason is the distance to market. Assume that it costs you $.30 a mile to drive your pickup. Now assume that your market is 100 miles away. That means that your round trip (and EVERY trip) with your veggies has cost you $60, and you haven't sold anything yet. This gets expensive.

    Land close to market is a more economic investment.

    LAstly, land close to a city will probably be subdivided eventually, and the owner will make a killing when he sells it.
     
  7. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    Location:
    Back in the USA
    A lot of factors affect the price. We paid $8,000 for a bit over 40 acres a few years ago. The only problem with the land is access. Getting to the parcel is extremely difficult other than though our property which has the only road access. We certainly didn't argue about the price. It turned out to be the best place out of all the acreage we own to find herbs.
     
  8. rzrubek

    rzrubek Flying Z

    Messages:
    641
    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Location:
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Land in the phoenix metro area can run anywhere from 10K to 100K+ per acre. Not kidding, 2nd fastest growing area in the nation.
     
  9. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    May 14, 2002
    Just the process of supply and demand at work. I've seen land go as much as $4.5 million per acre around here. In places like NYC, you are easily looking at 2 or 3 times that. LOCATION is everything. :cool:
     
  10. Bluecreekrog

    Bluecreekrog Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Jun 21, 2002
    Location:
    S Oh.
    The other half of the farm I purchased sold at just over $5g an acre, I bought the crop and pasture land for less than half that price.
     
  11. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    Feb 19, 2004
    Location:
    Maryland
    I think the main factor is jobs -- availability and what they pay. Are there a lot of $75,000 and up jobs near you? There are lots near here, so property is $5000 to $10000 an acre and up, because there are lots of well-paid folks who are willing to pay... and lots of developers itching to get their hands on the land to subdivide into "country estates." Of course, that also means lots of wealthy folks willing to pay top dollar for farm fresh meat, eggs, veggies, etc. So, it's a trade off and you have to decide where on the continuum you want to be.

     
  12. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Middle of nowhere along the Rim, Arizona
    And that's an estimate on the LOW side for phoenix, in rural areas. In the last few months, land in places like Coolidge and Queen Creek -- AKA "the boonies" where it was $400-500 (hundred) an acre ten years ago is going for $100,000 (one hundred thousand) or more an acre. Property in the area around Maricopa is going for $40K-100K an acre now when it was $2-3K just a few years ago.

    It's insane. I'm SO glad I bought in when I did.

    There's a lot of "Beverly Hillbilly" stories out here, only it's land, not oil -- folks who bought 40 acres ten years ago for $20K selling out for millions to developers ... people being forced out by property tax increases,too.

    Leva

     
  13. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    833
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver, and Moberly Lake, BC, Canada
    Bought our Quarter Section four years ago for $22,000 USD or $34,000 CDN at the time. Price is about the same now.

    Have you seen this image of our new planting -- Barley, 55 acres:

    [​IMG]
    55 acres of new Barley, heading out last fall -- this is part of the $22,000 usd Quarter Section -- 160 acres, pine, spruce, poplar, creek.

    That's $137.50 per acre USD, and that is in the minimum allowed to be purchased or sold -- not allowed to subdivide -- in the area where our land is. Larger holdings sell for less per acre. BTW ours is fenced on all four sides, though we did spend money and effort for breaking, working and seeding.

    Alex