Ack! We've got Coyotes!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by russellsmom, Nov 17, 2004.

  1. russellsmom

    russellsmom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    63
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    I've been in this valley for several years and I've heard tale of people seeing coyotes in this area, usually up close to the mountains. Last week there was a group of three or so coyotes who killed a deer a mere few yards from our barn on the other side of the road. Several groups of people who were out spotlighting saw them. Now I'm just a nervous wreck. I supose it's better to know that they're around, but I have these delicious little pygmy goats and some very tasty sheep both of which are no match for a hungry coyote. What are some of the best coyote deterents?
     
  2. aaatraker

    aaatraker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004



    guardian dogs and or a good rifle
     

  3. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    Rifle; and come dusk all of your animals are inside good solid walls and doors.
     
  4. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    734
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    Coyotes were very common in the mountain community we moved from in California, as were bobcats and mountain lions.

    Your best defense is to lock your animals up at night. That isn't to say that any of the above won't also attack in daylight; however they tend to be a bit less aggressive when the sun is out and so are the big humans. (Although I have seen both coyotes and mountain lions walk right down the middle of our street mid-afternoon as if they ruled the world!)

    A shotgun will very much scare them off but not forever. Loud banging on garbage can lids can be equally effective, amazingly. (Maybe it just shocks them!)

    All these animals do go for the easiest prey -- cats are especially vunerable (and your best hunters will be eaten first -- they forget to look behind them while they are hunting and become the hunted). Chickens are another favorite easy food.

    If you have coyotes or mountain lions, be sure to NEVER tie up your dog. It makes the animal a sitting duck! Also, do NOT feed your dogs/cats outside.

    This time of year you're dealing with the "teenagers." These are the almost adults who are trying to make their own territory. And just like human teenagers, they have no fear and think they are immortal. They will take risks a seasoned adult will not. So be vigilant!

    Best wishes.
    BW
     
  5. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    We've always had coyotes around here. The only time I had to do away with one when it got too 'friendly' with a dog that was in heat and wanted to become one of the 'pack'.
    I agree that a good guardian dog that can patrol your property will help keep coyotes away.
     
  6. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,649
    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    Hill Country, Texas
    A good anatolian shepard or Great Pyr seems like a sensible solution to me.
     
  7. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    594
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    centeral Okla. S of I-40, E of I-35
    dogs dogs dogs

    One dog has little chance against a pack, two dogs get really tired, while three good dogs can handle a dozen, tag teaming for hours or all night if need be.
     
  8. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    167
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Virginia
    "Several groups of people who were out spotlighting saw them. "

    Uh, this would scare the heck out of me...
     
  9. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,649
    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    Hill Country, Texas
    Do you live in the city ChuckinVa?? We varmit hunt with spotlights all the time here in Texas. Great way to get feral hogs too.
     
  10. Bob Mc

    Bob Mc Member

    Messages:
    22
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2004
    Location:
    California
    Shoot ‘em, or trap ‘em if legal. Your profile doesn’t say where you live. Call your local County Agriculture Department. It is possible that you have a County or Federal Animal Damage Control Specialist (formally called ADC trappers) available to handle such problems.
     
  11. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

    Messages:
    1,600
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    RussellsMom,

    Livestock Guardian Dogs. http://lgd.org the pictures at the top of the page...find one that you are attracted to and click on the picture. Read the information in the Library about raising these magnificiant dogs, join the discussion group lgd-l list. I can't praise these dogs enough. I sleep well at night knowing they are on patrol.
     
  12. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,700
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Missouri
    Coyotes usually kill small animals like cats, chickens, rodents and such. They will kill your sheep or small goats also though. I doubt that they killed the deer. I would be more inclined to think that it was a deer that a hunter wounded and then didn't find. That happens a lot. We had that happen on our place this year and the coyotes cleaned that deer up fast! There are coyotes almost everywhere. even in the citys. I have only lost a very few chickens to them here and that was in the day time when the chickens got brave and wandered too far from the house. I loose more birds to coons than anything else. I had a coyote trot right by our emu in the barn yard one afternoon while we were up there at the barn. It didn't even look at it or us. Just trotted along the fence on its way back from the river. it wasn't two feet from the emu. The emu didn't panic either which was strange. It was laying down at the time and just stayed there.
     
  13. Rouen

    Rouen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    North East
    coyotes in the north east(so-called eastern coyotes) have adapted to hunt like wolves and bring down big game.. like deer, it's not uncommon here(MA) to hear packs of 7+ coyotes howling.
     
  14. Terrabus

    Terrabus Middle-Aged Delinquent

    Messages:
    264
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Location:
    Browntown, WI--the land of cheese!
    I live in Northern Illinois. We have a lot of coyotes. At night, you can hear them "sing". What we always thought was odd was their favorite meal, cats. In fact, the hunters and trappers around here use cats as bait. I knew a farmer who had over 40 cats and by the end of summer, he was down to 1 because that smart kitty refused to leave the porch. In fact, it went nuts if you tried to carry it off the porch for any reason. I don't know of anybody who lost birds or livestock of any kind due to coyotes, just cats. Lots and lots of cats.


    Ted
     
  15. Rouen

    Rouen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    North East
  16. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    951
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Here in north Alabama the coyotes are often brave enough to come out in broad daylight and run around. They will also come right into yards at night and stand under the "bugger" lights!

    We make sure all our animals are safely enclosed every night. We will hopefully be getting a guardian dog later too but right now have an Eskimo Spitz that thinks she is a guard dog and who lives with the goats....but they are penned at night and are right behind the house....

    When our neighbor killed the lead of the coyotes a couple of years ago all the other coyotes mourned ALL night long....it was the most pitiful sound. Then they left and didn't come back for six months....I guess they regrouped with a new leader. best wishes.
     
  17. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,177
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    It is very unlikely that coyotes took down a healthy deer. Young , injured or sick yes. They are smarter than that. In the wild they do not want to work that hard or take a chance of getting injured, that means almost certain death to them. Coyote populations run hand in hand with the food supply. Up North here if we have alot of rabbits and mice we have alot of fox and coyote. They will take easier barn yard animals chickens, cats, lambs and goat kids and a new born calf. Most of the time dec or animal control will tell you to shoot them in season or if they are threatening your stock. Another option is to find a local trapper. If you have enough land they can set far enough away from the barn animals not to be a problem. You may want to keep your cats penned up or a dog if it roams. The trap used will probally be a leg hold set unless snares are legal there. 220 or 330 bucket sets will not work well. To find a trapper your state probally has a trappers ass. if you cannot find a # pm me and I will try to look in my stuff for it.Good luck ~ Patty
     
  18. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    510
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    SE PA, zone 6b
    Get all your animals secure for the night, and protect chickens in a chicken tractor or a fenced yard for the daytime. I agree with Gene Logsdon: step one on a new homestead is to get a good tight perimeter fence around the entire property and patrol it frequently.

    Then, enjoy the reducing mouse and other rodent population (principle diet of coyotes). There are many predators out there. Racoons can be some of the most troublesome and viscious. I live in a suburban neighborhood, and there is a fox den (she's been seen) a few hundred feet away and a pair of resident red-tails. When I get the chickens, I will have a large pen that is covered with netting, and the birds will go inside at night.

    Some of the most beautiful music I've heard is the song of the God Dogs on a clear cold night. They seem to be singing just for the pure joy of it. They are very skilled opportunists, who need their daily bread just like the rest of us. Between guard dogs and fences, we can co-exist. Have you ever seen a fat predator?

    I've heard all the terrible stories of the damage done by coyotes. I think many of the stories are about the damage done by a larger predators and the coyotes will close in on the dinner opportunity. I am not saying they do no damage, just that they get blamed for a lot more than they actually do. Coyotes usually will only kill smaller prey than a cow or adult sheep unless they are weakened.

    OK, bring 'em on! :yeeha: :yeeha: :yeeha:

    Dare I sign my name? Sandi
     
  19. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    544
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    Location:
    Kansas
    Here in East Central Colorado, on the plains, we have a ton of coyotes. We had (note the HAD) one that killed off a bunch of our hens (they weren't roosting in the chicken house), and after that one was gone another came around and got some ducks & that we shot recently too. But it seems like it is really hard to get a shot off at them, they are pretty smart, not as easy as a smaller predator like a skunk or coon. They are also very quick, the first one would howl, which would get all the roosters crowing, and I would jump up out of bed and run out, and then while I was getting dressed he would push up a metal flap on the pig building, sneak under and practically step all over the sleeping pigs so he could grab a chicken on the ledge behind the pigs. By the time I would get out there he would be long gone.

    As far as dogs go, if you get a good dog, that would probably work good. I am a bit concerned myself, because we have goats & sheep, so we are trying to get the barn secure for them, but it is really just an open lean-to for hay. We did get two dogs this winter (golden retreiver, bird dogs, duh), but unfortunately, even though they were puppies growing up with young chickens, they decided the chickens & other poultry were a food source, even after hours of training them to leave the chickens alone. So we have the dogs penned up now, and I am not sure what we are going to do. They are wonderful dogs otherwise, great with our kids, don't jump up on you, well behaved, just not good with chickens. I am thinking of trying to find them a good home and getting a border collie, but I am a bit frustrated with dogs right now, I don't want to get another one and have the same thing happen, you know?

    Guess we will have some serious work to be done on securing the goat barn. Will electric fence keep the coyotes out if it is in close enough strands?
     
  20. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

    Messages:
    1,613
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    western New York
    There are coyotes and then there are coy-dogs...part coyote, part wild dogs. The coy-dogs are often vicious and less afraid of human contact. I recently lost a deer to a pack of coy-dogs.

    I have motion lights on the barn and electric fence around the perimeter. The wire for the fence is set at two levels; low if they try to get between the gaps in the gate & high if they try to go over. A secure barn or poultry hosue is a must have. Poultry netting will keep chickens in but doesn't offer much protection against an animal this size.

    Patty offered a good suggestion regarding soliciting help from a local trapper. Most trappers will jump for joy at the chance to have a good location to use their skills. States like NY require a trapper's education course before you can legal trap any animal, including those that are causing a nuisance. Check with your local DEC or Game Warden...they may even be able to put you in touch with someone willing to help out.

    I, too, enjoy the night time seranade of the coyotes. Unfortunately, when they become a threat to the kids & livestock, it's time to welcome back the silence. Good luck.