AC question

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by 65284, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm looking at an older vehicle that had the misfortune to get a piece of road junk through the AC condenser. The condenser has been replaced but the system was not recharged. I called a couple of places and WOW are they proud of freon. Does anyone know anything about the r134 conversion? What does it consist of, is it just a different refrigerant or are there changes made to the compressor, etc?
     
  2. Yankee1

    Yankee1 Well-Known Member

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    The compressor is the same you have to get all the oil out of the compressor and change the oil. thenyou have to change your freon connections for 134. Evacuate and charge the system. provided your dryer and orifice tube are ok you should have cold air.
     

  3. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks Yankee,

    What kind of a $ are we talkin about? I know it would depend uopn the specific car, but just an average ball park figure.
     
  4. Yankee1

    Yankee1 Well-Known Member

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    To have a shop do it it should be around $150.00
     
  5. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks again, that sounds great, not nearly as bad as what I had expected.
     
  6. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    $150 should cover the freon! Since the system has been open a new drier/accumulator is necessary. Besides the drier is where most of the old oil will be and it needs to be removed and drained. The compressor needs to also be removed and drined of oil. you then need a conversion kit which includes new oil compatible with R134 and conversion fittings for the gauge hookups. Let's not forget the price of the condenser and labor to replace it. Be sure whoever does this is competent as many converted A/C systems have compressor failure due to wrong oil, not enough oil, overchrged system, system pressures too high, and in some cases simply because the old style compressor cannot handle R134 and the different pressures.