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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
At this time, shes uncomfortable enough that her owner indicates she's laying down a lot, which puts her at risk for pneumonia or worse and between hormonal changes and additional weight on the hoof, there could be greater damage.
I just want to clarify here that her abscess is healing. I am not overly concerned about it at this point. She is not laying down as much as she was, and she is back to her normal self. She was a really good girl last night, and she let me handle it. It seems to be doing much much better now, and I'm going to have the vet take a look at it as well, when I bring them in.

@Lisa in WA I am 16.
 

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Not everyone posts all the relevant information. She had said the donkeys were under the care of a vet and a farrier. Both professionals did not advise against breeding. Supposedly thd vet knows more about all that has been going on with the donkeys than those who have half the information.

Abbey, did you notice the abscess before or after the 2nd breeding attempt?
 

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Not everyone posts all the relevant information. She had said the donkeys were under the care of a vet and a farrier. Both professionals did not advise against breeding. Supposedly thd vet knows more about all that has been going on with the donkeys than those who have half the information.

Abbey, did you notice the abscess before or after the 2nd breeding attempt?
The lameness predates the second breeding attempt and it's my understanding goes back to the time when she purchased the animal with at least one overgrown hoof, that looks a lot like laminitis.

I'm not sure that she consulted with the vet about the wisdom of breeding and I'm not sure the vet is offering much beyond quick fix solutions or there would have been x-rays of the hoof to identify the position of the coffin bone.
 

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Yes, the hoof issue was there before the first attempt.

Was a vet consulted before the first attempt? I don't know. The vet who did the ultrasound should have brought up the hoof issue then.

If the vet said something about not breeding the one with the hoof problem and the op did it anyway, chastisement is warranted.

And now after reading all the posted information, I should hope the op does not consider breeding the one with the hoof issue again without having it looked at more closely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
The overgrown hoof was there when I bought her, she had it during the first and second breeding. Both my vet and my farrier have told me that xrays are not necessary. I have asked them both about it. There is a surgery I could do to fix the hoof, but it is 5k, and not a guaranteed fix. Since I don't have the money, it's not an option. The vet said that with continual trimming, the pastern ligaments may heal. So that is what I am doing. I have the farrier trimming her every 4 weeks, and she is on restricted feed. It is not laminitis, or founder, all, or at least one other, hoof would also be overgrown if that were the case.
Both the vet and farrier have confirmed that.
The abscess appeared after the second breeding. The day before the stud returned. It is now healing, and she is putting weight on it, and letting me touch it. The vet will take a look on it on the 28th though, to make sure I'm not missing anything.
 

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Yes, the hoof issue was there before the first attempt.

Was a vet consulted before the first attempt? I don't know. The vet who did the ultrasound should have brought up the hoof issue then.

If the vet said something about not breeding the one with the hoof problem and the op did it anyway, chastisement is warranted.

And now after reading all the posted information, I should hope the op does not consider breeding the one with the hoof issue again without having it looked at more closely.
A vet isn't going to advise against breeding unless you ask about it or at least mention it's part of the plan.

Another concern is that if this isn't a case of laminitis, there is a chance that another backyard breeder is passing on weak genetics for somebody else to deal with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
A vet isn't going to advise against breeding unless you ask about it or at least mention it's part of the plan.
She did know I was breeding her. She still did not advise against it. As did my farrier. I talked to them both about it. Neither said anything to me about it.
Another concern is that if this isn't a case of laminitis, there is a chance that another backyard breeder is passing on weak genetics for somebody else to deal with.
Her overgrown hoof is NOT genetics! I don't know how many times I have to say this, but it is because she has loosened the ligaments in her pastern. We do not know how. Could have been from tripping over a root, falling in a hole, or kicking out at something. This caused the pastern ligaments to loosen, the coffin bone to sink down into the hoof, and the hoof to grow weirdly because it knows something is wrong. It is not hereditary, and will not be passed on to the baby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Okay. I can understand people warning me, and telling me their opinion on my actions. But that was just rude. Sorry, but it was.
You don't know anything about me. Only what I have told you about the donkeys, and what everyone else has said, and assumed about me. You have assumed that I am a 'stupid teenager'. Maybe I am, but I don't think so. That may sound like I'm full of myself, but I'm not.
Plus, my dad was right there with me the whole time. He had to drive the donkeys in. If the vet really thought I was a 'stupid ol' teenager' she could have told my dad not to breed them. If she was uncomfortable saying anything to him in front of me, she had plenty of time to do it while I was loading the donkeys in the trailer.
I realize now that it wasn't smart to breed Ruby. I have said that a thousand times. I feel like I literally just keep repeating myself, and no one is listening to what I'm saying.
Yes I am young. Yes you might think I am 'irresponsible' and an 'animal abuser'. But if you knew anything about who I really am, you wouldn't say anything like that. Everyone that actually know me, says I have a special love, and passion for animals. I would never do anything to hurt them, and I do listen to what people tell me. That is why I bred the girls in the first place. My dad told me it would be a good idea. I know realize that it was stupid, and I have already said that I won't be breeding her again if she didn't take this time.
 

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Okay. I can understand people warning me, and telling me their opinion on my actions. But that was just rude. Sorry, but it was.
You don't know anything about me. Only what I have told you about the donkeys, and what everyone else has said, and assumed about me. You have assumed that I am a 'stupid teenager'. Maybe I am, but I don't think so. That may sound like I'm full of myself, but I'm not.
Plus, my dad was right there with me the whole time. He had to drive the donkeys in. If the vet really thought I was a 'stupid ol' teenager' she could have told my dad not to breed them. If she was uncomfortable saying anything to him in front of me, she had plenty of time to do it while I was loading the donkeys in the trailer.
I realize now that it wasn't smart to breed Ruby. I have said that a thousand times. I feel like I literally just keep repeating myself, and no one is listening to what I'm saying.
Yes I am young. Yes you might think I am 'irresponsible' and an 'animal abuser'. But if you knew anything about who I really am, you wouldn't say anything like that. Everyone that actually know me, says I have a special love, and passion for animals. I would never do anything to hurt them, and I do listen to what people tell me. That is why I bred the girls in the first place. My dad told me it would be a good idea. I know realize that it was stupid, and I have already said that I won't be breeding her again if she didn't take this time.
At the end of the day, they are your animals, you can do what you want with them and would encourage you to realize that you have two options. You can learn from the experience of others or you can do exactly what you're doing now. Do what you feel is best for you and learn from the mistakes you make. Sometimes it will turn out well and sometimes it will be very costly. Somebody should have helped you make your first purchase so you could have avoided unsound animals but that's the start of the learning process.

I don't think you're stupid but I do believe you are willful and assume that passion is all you need. I hope your experience is a good one but the biggest thing that turns young people away from their passion for animals is cost, painful learning curves.
 

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Something that turns young people away from asking for advice is people being nasty and mean without giving helpful advice. There are posters who jump all over those who make mistakes or jump into a project without looking. They forget they might have made those same mistakes themselves.
 

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Something that turns young people away from asking for advice is people being nasty and mean without giving helpful advice. There are posters who jump all over those who make mistakes or jump into a project without looking. They forget they might have made those same mistakes themselves.
I’ve only seen one poster here be mean in any way. And that post appears to have been deleted.
is there something I’m missing?
 

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It was a general statement, not necessarily relating to incidents in this thread. I have seen it in other threads.
 

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It was a general statement, not necessarily relating to incidents in this thread. I have seen it in other threads.
Unfortunately, your sentiment is what has chased off a lot of our most experienced members.

They also thought that if someone asks for advice, they actually wanted advice.
 

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Not appreciating nastiness is chasing away older members?

Gee, I thought it was the bickering and heated debates resulting in a slew of banned posters that lost a lot of members. The general board changes cost the site quite a few members. A good number of our most experienced posters has passed away just recently too. Are you suggesting that my sentiment against general nastiness had something to do with all that?
 

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Not appreciating nastiness is chasing away older members?

Gee, I thought it was the bickering and heated debates resulting in a slew of banned posters that lost a lot of members. The general board changes cost the site quite a few members. A good number of our most experienced posters has passed away just recently too. Are you suggesting that my sentiment against general nastiness had something to do with all that?
No, I'm not and there was no bickering but there was one out of line comment, which I deleted before it was even reported.

What I am saying is that those of us with experience, that you're chastising were actually trying to avoid seeing a young member have to euthanize a beloved pet and now that you have there is a strong chance, nobody is going to step of that ledge again.
 

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Unfortunately, your sentiment is what has chased off a lot of our most experienced members.

They also thought that if someone asks for advice, they actually wanted advice.
First of all, my post was written between the time that post was made and when it was deleted.
Second, in this thread, the deed was done before this thread was posted.
Third, you stated that objections to nastiness chased off older, more experienced members. That is not true.
Fourth, I don't want her donkey to have additional problems either. If it was mine I would not have bred her until the hoof issue was cleared up. I would not have bred either of them until they had been tamed down enough to be handled.
Fifth, reading this thread to that point as it is now, I would not have posted what was there. Feel free to delete it and all my responses in this thread if you wish.

AbbeySmith, I know you are anxious to have baby donkeys but I hope this breeding didn't take either. You need to get the hoof problem resolved and the donkeys need to tolerate being handled more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
You need to get the hoof problem resolved and the donkeys need to tolerate being handled more.
Yes. I know. The farrier is coming out in the next week or so and will have another look at her. And they go in to the vet on Wed, so she will look at them too.
As for them having to be more 'handleable'. Where exactly did you get the idea that they weren't? Not being rude here. Just genuinely curious. They weren't when I got them, but they are very well behaved now. I have no problem handling them. Minus leading, but we're still working on that.
 

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Didn't you say they were good for you but not necessarily other people? I know you said the one didn't like you messing with her foot, but it may be just that foot. Sorry if I misunderstood. I know you have been working hard to get them to allow you to touch and groom them.

Do you have halters that fit them? Leading is a big part of handling. They might get a bit overprotective if they have babies and you don't want them trying to push you away from a baby that needs attention from you or a vet. It's hard to teach them to be led without proper halters.

Do they let you brush and groom them? Not just their backs but down their legs and through the tail?

Some animals get a little weird during pregnancy, delivery and when the babies are very young. I know donkeys have been having babies for thousands of years. Most of the time without any problem. But I also know how difficult it is to stand by and not be able to get near a first time mama that is skittish but needs help. If they are halter trained you would at least be able to tie them if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Didn't you say they were good for you but not necessarily other people?
Yes and no. If the person handling them actually knows what they're doing, they're good for them. Not saying that I know everything that I'm doing! I know I definitely do not. But they are used to the way I teach them. For example, they are really good for the farrier and have no problem with him! He can lift their hooves, trim them, rasp them, no problem! My brother goes to just touch their feet, and uh-uh. They can tell that he's nervous of being kicked or something, and won't let him.
the one didn't like you messing with her foot
That was just when the abscess was still being a problem for her. And I worked with her a bit, and she was letting me touch it eventhough it hurt. And she's back to normal now. No problems there.
Do you have halters that fit them?
Yep! They each have their own halter, and leads.
Do they let you brush and groom them? Not just their backs but down their legs and through the tail?
Yes! They are very very good for grooming! I usually groom them at least 4 times a week, usually more. They are super good for it. I don't have to tie them up or anything, I can brush them pretty much anywhere I want, down the legs, on the face, under the belly, etc.
If they are halter trained you would at least be able to tie them if necessary.
Yes they are completely halter broke. Zero problem there. They are actually really good for the halters. And I have tied them up a lot to get them used to it, and they have no problem with it.

Also, I'm going to be locking them up in a smaller pen before they foal out. Right now they are in a 15x30ft pen. Usually they are out in a 20 acre field (I can still get halter on them, and groom them, and lift their feet in the field). So I'll lock them up probably by month 11 or 12? I think anyways! I still have a ton to figure out!
 

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Also, I'm going to be locking them up in a smaller pen before they foal out. Right now they are in a 15x30ft pen. Usually they are out in a 20 acre field (I can still get halter on them, and groom them, and lift their feet in the field). So I'll lock them up probably by month 11 or 12? I think anyways! I still have a ton to figure out!
Locking them in a small pen isn't always a great idea.

Lack of exercise can cause delivery problems, equines don't actually like being watched when they deliver, which is why most breeders use cameras and in the last term most of the nutrients are going to the baby so no exercise and a fat baby often lead to big vet bills.
 
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