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So I sent some pictures of her hoof to the vet the other day. Vet says that the abscess has popped, and it blew up through the coronary band. Which is good I guess in most circumstances. But since the abscess is on the one overgrown hoof, the hoof pinches it as she walks :/ So she lays down a lot which isn't good. It would be so much easier if it had been on any of the other hooves, but of course it had to be that one.
How is just one hoof ”overgrown”?
 

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This may have some information for you.

While reading the book ‘Perfect Partners by Kelly Marks (an excellent book by the way) I was struck by a very true statement she made…. “Well meaning is not the same as well being for the horse”.

One of the ways we tend to show good care for our horse is to provide plenty of feed. Unfortunately this over-caring can be cruel to a horse or pony especially in spring and early summer when grasses are high in sugar.

Our equines (that includes donkeys and mules) often have to endure the pain of a hoof abscess caused by too much rich grass, and can be affected even if they don’t appear to be overweight. These photos show the various stages of an abscess which in the beginning can cause three-legged lameness before it bursts through soft tissue
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The pain the horse endures at this stage is similar to when you hit your thumb with a hammer and the swelling and blood is trapped under your thumbnail.

Eventually the pus and serum are forced from the internal hoof structures and come out through the coronet band or heel bulb areas.
HoofAbscessCoronet

An abscess that has burst through the coronary band.
Sometimes a milder abscess is not even evident in a horse not exercised regularly, only showing up when the hoof trimmer discovers a rotting hole in the sole or hoof wall.


https://naturalhorseworld.com/hoof-abscess/#:~:text=A hoof abscess can be a warning sign,or treats but this can cause more problems.
 

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@AbbySmith, you just can't get some people to understand what you are saying when they already have judged what you are doing.
You are misinformed. The problem is that even if someone is young, they still need to learn. She has mentioned a couple times that one or both of the donks are not sound and lameness indicates something hurts.
 

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You are misinformed. The problem is that even if someone is young, they still need to learn. She has mentioned a couple times that one or both of the donks are not sound and lameness indicates something hurts.
You weren't listening to some of what was said. The abcess was a new development after the missed attempt at breeding. The group scolding was given after the missed attempt at breeding. Granted, the overgrown hoof should have been corrected before breeding but that apparently happened before the poster visited ht.

Education is one thing. Continually chastising a poster for past mistakes is not education.
 

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The scolding comes from her firm statement that she is bringing a Jack for a play date.

The soundness issue is longstanding and no cure in sight. Lameness indicates pain, pain will increase with additional weight and if laminitis is involved, the shift of nutrients to the foals, will make a bad thing worse.

Continual laying down is extremely dangerous for equines and can result in pneumonia or cause sever muscle atrophy.

I fully understand the mistakes of others but consciously doing the same is unwise under these circumstances.

I have have about 50 years experience and have strongly suggested verifying that the hoof problem can be corrected and the animal made sound before breeding.

Please explain why you feel breeding her with a significant health issue is urgent or wise? It’s my understanding she’s approximately 5 years old, so there is plenty of time to make sure she well enough to breed safely. Wouldn’t you agree?
 

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It was my understanding that after the first breeding didn't take, she had decided to wait to breed the one with the problem hoof after hearing the advice from knowledgeble and experienced people on this board. I agree that it would not be wise to breed that particular animal while it is undergoing treatment for the hoof problem.

The donkey with the hoof issues should be evaluated by a vet to see if it is sound enough to withstand the extra stress that would occur if a pregnancy was allowed to happen. That was brought to the op's attention. From what I have read, she has dropped, for now, the issue of breeding the donkeys.
 

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@AbbySmith
Have both donks been bred including the lame one?
Is the stud in with them?
 

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Abbey, please set the record straight. Are you still planning on breeding the donkey with the foot problem before the foot is healed?
 

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And the stud was referenced again two weeks ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
The stud was brought here 3 weeks ago. He was with the girls for 2 weeks before I brought him back last Sunday.
He was with the both of the donkeys at separate times, they go in for ultrasounds on the 28th of July so I will see who is bred then.
I did have him with the one with the overgrown hoof, because I had thought that my farrier would be able to fix it. As of today, I realize that it probably wasn't the best decision, even though my farrier should have her fixed up by the time she gets further along, I realize now that I should have waited until she was better to begin the breeding process. There is nothing I can do about it now, and that is why I have not responded to a lot of things on this thread.
I have made my decision, I realize a lot of you think it was a bad one, but there is nothing I can do about it now.
If the donks turn out to not be bred, I will not be trying to rebreed them. Possibly the one with good hooves, but definitely not the other.
I'm not even sure if I would breed one, I may just keep them, or sell them. I don't know yet. I will decided after the 28th.
Also, my vet and my farrier both knew that I was going to breed her, and neither of them said anything. I feel like if it was as big of a deal as you guys have made it, they would have at least said something. I do realize that it was not a smart decision, and I get where you guys are coming from. I really do. And I have taken it all into account by deciding I won't try and rebreed her. As of right now, there is nothing I can do about it.
Any more questions?
 

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The stud was brought here 3 weeks ago.
Pet peeve.

Please forgive me for being a nit picker, however, a stud is a male horse and a jack or jackass is a male donkey.

https://researchmaniacs.com/Animals/Male/What-is-a-male-Donkey-called.html

Unless you were going for hinnies and were actually employing a stud to accomplish that end.


A ‘mule’ is a widely used term is the offspring of a male donkey (a jack) and a female horse (a mare).

A ‘hinny’ does not refer to a donkey or an ass either. It is the hybrid between a female donkey (a jenny) and a male horse (stallion). Genealogically, it is more difficult to reproduce a hinny in comparison to a mule.

What is the Difference Between a Donkey, a Mule and an Ass?
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Ok. That is good to know! Honestly.
I've just always used the term 'stud' for any male animal used to breed a female. Doesn't matter the animal. But good to know! 👍
 

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The stud was brought here 3 weeks ago. He was with the girls for 2 weeks before I brought him back last Sunday.
He was with the both of the donkeys at separate times, they go in for ultrasounds on the 28th of July so I will see who is bred then.
I did have him with the one with the overgrown hoof, because I had thought that my farrier would be able to fix it. As of today, I realize that it probably wasn't the best decision, even though my farrier should have her fixed up by the time she gets further along, I realize now that I should have waited until she was better to begin the breeding process. There is nothing I can do about it now, and that is why I have not responded to a lot of things on this thread.
I have made my decision, I realize a lot of you think it was a bad one, but there is nothing I can do about it now.
If the donks turn out to not be bred, I will not be trying to rebreed them. Possibly the one with good hooves, but definitely not the other.
I'm not even sure if I would breed one, I may just keep them, or sell them. I don't know yet. I will decided after the 28th.
Also, my vet and my farrier both knew that I was going to breed her, and neither of them said anything. I feel like if it was as big of a deal as you guys have made it, they would have at least said something. I do realize that it was not a smart decision, and I get where you guys are coming from. I really do. And I have taken it all into account by deciding I won't try and rebreed her. As of right now, there is nothing I can do about it.
Any more questions?
There are ways to correct you poor decision but I don’t get the impression you would be interested.

I also don’t get the impression you are consulting with your vet or your farrier to the degree you should. Perhaps you aren’t experienced enough to know what questions to ask or maybe you aren’t comfortable asking.

You need to know the cause of the abscess so you can be sure it’s resolved. You need to know what causes the overgrown hoof in order to know what her long term prognosis is.
 

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You weren't listening to some of what was said. The abcess was a new development after the missed attempt at breeding. The group scolding was given after the missed attempt at breeding. Granted, the overgrown hoof should have been corrected before breeding but that apparently happened before the poster visited ht.

Education is one thing. Continually chastising a poster for past mistakes is not education.
I'm actually waiting for your response on this one because you chastised me when you ignored critical information.

The jack was returned for another 'play date', which means she could very well could be bred and another UT has been scheduled to confirm.

At this time, shes uncomfortable enough that her owner indicates she's laying down a lot, which puts her at risk for pneumonia or worse and between hormonal changes and additional weight on the hoof, there could be greater damage.

My dissention is because I really don't want to see a young girl put in the position where she may have to euthanize a beloved animal. Perhaps you share your thoughts and expertise because it seems like an awful harsh lesson for any young person.
 
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