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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of our 2-month-old piglets developed some lumps that seem to be abscesses. They first appeared about a week ago, as two lumps just above the pig's scrotum, and we thought it was just a hernia. Over time the lumps became larger and harder, so we decided to butcher him tonight, since that's where he was headed soon anyway... :) Well, it turns out there were a lot more lumps once we got him cut open; about 8 or 10 in the fatty tissue, and even one small one in the liver. When we cut them open they were full of thick green goo (pictures attached), and researching this has led us to conclude that they must have been abscesses. The question is, what would have caused these internal lumps? And most importantly, can we still eat this little critter???!!! Or does anyone have any other suggestions as to what they might have been, if not abscesses?

BTW, this is an intact male.

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(The dark green flecks are just pieces of grass from the piece falling onto the lawn.)
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Misty Gonzales
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it looks like what goats can get called CL, or caseous lymphadenitis. Highly contagious and abcesses can form internally on the organs. But Pete, I don't know if hogs can get it. I suppose they could...I just don't know if it would be called CL or not.
 

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I Am no expert But I think if there is somthing wrong with the liver they condem the meat. Im not sure if this would be concidered a condemed carcus. Can you call your local slaughter house and ask them.
 

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Pete, this is very common with commercial hogs...not as much in the states anymore but its what you hear the hog guys call tumors, you have an advanced case caused by years of not addressing the problem in the breeding barn. Your hogs by my guess area york- landrace mix, I just hate landrace hogs. It took years to develpoe the problem and will take years to fix. Some hogs are very sensitive with their diets, they have been bred to grow very fast on certain foods - when you feed a mix of everything to these hogs they don't break it down right. I known it kills you to hear that. In the last 2 years I have had two high dollar purchases have to be destroyed - they looked great but where not genetically sound upon review. If your hogs are heritage, my answer is off base, but if they are confinement hogs... I pretty sure I'm right. They need the exact formula feed they where bred for or best they need culling completely and starting over.
 

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agmantoo
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I saw the post yesterday and did not respond. Looking closely at the top picture you will see 2 pocklike marks, one on each leg. My experience with hogs has me to conclude that the abscesses are a result of infection and the pock marks support my opinion. These animals have been exposed to conditions that generated lots of scratches/cuts/scrape/bites that broke the skin and thus the infection. I would not consume the flesh.
 

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thats not what I'd call an abscess. Abscesses I have seen tend to be larger and less localized than these - usually full of mayonnaise-like purulent matter. They nearly explode under the pressure. (yuckeypitooey -I can almost taste it) Most of them were a result of "pressure sores" from a heavy "downer" hog (or cow) laying on a hip, lets say - or from an injection site -probably dirty needle or surface contamination.
I agree, I have lanced alot of abscesses....This is different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The pigs are in an overgrown field, rooting and pushing and shoving with their littler mates and their mother. The pig did have a fair number of minor scratches and nicks, likely caused by pushing their way through a bit of brush, as they love to do. My CHILDREN if undressed and cleaned would show similar scratches from similar activities.

If these are abscesses, they were caused by bacteria, and bacteria are killed by cooking. Why could you not cook it well and eat the meat?

I'm thinking it is Pyaemia, explained below:

http://www.nadis.org.uk/BPEX Bulletins/Carcase Condemnation.pdf
 

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agmantoo
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I am of the opinion that I am correct and support my position. These are generalized abscesses and I feel that the processing plant would condemn the carcass. I have seen some things that they will permit to pass and I would not risk eating them either. You have no idea as to the exact source of the bacteria and the risk to health is too great. In a processing plant the line would be stopped after cutting into the abscess as you did until everything was cleaned and replacement knives were provided.
 

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Wind in Her Hair said:
thats not what I'd call an abscess. Abscesses I have seen tend to be larger and less localized than these - usually full of mayonnaise-like purulent matter. They nearly explode under the pressure. (yuckeypitooey -I can almost taste it) Most of them were a result of "pressure sores" from a heavy "downer" hog (or cow) laying on a hip, lets say - or from an injection site -probably dirty needle or surface contamination.

agman, those pock marks could also be from getting killed. :)
I agree with agman. Not all abscesses are the same. I'm willing to bet that if you cut that pig you will find more in the joints.

I wouldn't eat it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We're on the same page, agmantoo. If you follow the link to read up about Pyaemia, you will see that it is characterized by generalized abscesses, and that the meat is condemned.

If I cook the *snot* out of it, can I feed it to my two strapping GSDs? After all, they do eat raw rabbits and opposums and raccoons on occasion... :)
 

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nz1h said:
In the picture the stuff looked green.
Why would you say it wasn't CL??
trying to learn
alain
I don't think CL affects hogs.
 

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I would only feed it to the dogs. See if you cant can it so it wont get mixed in with your meat and wont cost too much more to store it. Mix it with oat meal and apples and youll have a great natural feed for your dogs.
 

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Misty Gonzales
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CL puss can be greenish like that. Had a goat erupt with tons after she was hauled to a new location and put under some stress. That is what it looked like. It was cultured from the vet and that is how I know for sure it was CL. I am not saying it is, I'm saying that is what they looked like. I am not sure if pigs can get it either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hmmm...I just found this on the Net this morning. Kinda makes you wonder...

C705 Caseous lymphadenitis

A caseous abscessation of lymph nodes and internal organs caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The disease occurs worldwide and is an important endemic infection in regions with large sheep and goat populations. Economic losses result from reduced weight gain, reproductive efficiency, and milk production, as well as from condemnation of carcasses and devaluation of hides. Although principally an infection of sheep and goats, sporadic disease also occurs in horses and cattle, and water buffalo, wild ruminants, primates, pigs, and fowl.
 

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Misty Gonzales
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interesting. I think that is what it is. Did the contents have odor? CL does not have the odor like "puss infection" It can be almost a toothpaste consistancy.
Do some research on it. I know with the goats, my philosophy is, if you have them, it will happen eventually. I know of some breeders who will acutally (and I DON'T condone this practice) inject the abcess with formaldyhyde (sp). However that does nothing for the internal abcesses. It is VERY contagious and will live forever in the ground, on the fence posts etc...Burn whatever you can.
 

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Pete, I'm going to have to agree with wind, I have unfortunately had alot of experience with the abcesses ag is talking about...and it's that not what you have. I will try to post some pics next time I treat a hog with before and after pics. You are on base with what you posted later. If Ag is right, and a simple scratch is to blame your pigs have serious immune issues... a hog should be able to fight and scratch all day and then lay in the filth unaffected.
 
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