? about wide row plantings

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by tambo, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. tambo

    tambo Well-Known Member

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    I planted some crowder peas using the wide row method this year.I broadcasted the seed by hand covering about 4x30 area.I know I got the seed thicker in some areas than others.The bed filled in nice.

    My questions are

    How do you sow your seed?

    How do you cover your seed?

    How has this method worked for you?

    Tambo
     
  2. chuckhole

    chuckhole Born city, love country

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    With this kind of planting, I have used a garden rake. I raked the area with the tines of the rake, broadcast the seed and flipped the rake over and used the flat side of the rake to smooth it out. Then the seeds got watered in. This usually resuled in a 1/4" to 1/2" planting depth and they were spread out pretty good.

    Now if could only get the salad greens and spinach to grow well, I would be OK.
     

  3. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    Same as the above post - rake for larger seed. For lettuce, spinach, carrots I sprinkle the seed all over then sprinkle the dirt to cover. To thin, I let them grow to baby gourmet size and then pull the entire plant. That way I don't waste the thinnings.

    I've planted using wide row method for 25 years. My only variation has been with melons and tomatoes. I plant those in wells rather than raised so that I conserve water.

    BW
     
  4. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    Forgot - I plant squashes in wells too.

    I have always gardened where rain does not water the garden during the summer. I use drip irrigation for the most part with occasional overhead.

    BW
     
  5. ladyrua

    ladyrua Well-Known Member

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    Sorry - what does "in wells" mean? Like in a hollow?

    Thanks!
     
  6. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wide row planting does not work well (efficiently) with plants that vine, like crowder peas, beans. You would do better to put a trellis in the middle of the row and plant a row of peas on either side. Then in the space from the middle to the edge put some greens.
     
  7. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We always plant our cabbage, lettuce, brocolli, etc., as transplants in wide rows, also onions, but plant the carrots as seed. We broadcast carrot seed, lightly broadcast a little radish seed to mark the area, sprinkle enough compst on it to cover, water it, then put an old bedsheet over it to keep it from drying out. If it is dry, we may water the sheet until sopping wet every few days, before the ground under it dries out. Remove the sheet when most of the area has carrot seedlings appearing.
     
  8. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    I have given up on broadcasting seed in wide rows.
    I have started sowing several rows lenthwise in 4 foot wide beds. For carrots for instance I put 6-7 rows. i just could not get scattered beds thinned. And if you don't thin carrots they won't grow.
     
  9. tambo

    tambo Well-Known Member

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    I covered my seed with a rake also.

    Mid Tn Mama I planted my crowder peas in long single rows the first time.They came up scattered.I replanted the peas in a 4x30 row.I am pleased with the results so for.I'm thinking about planting them in a bigger block next year.

    Thanks for the replys.

    Tambo
     
  10. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    Ladyrua - Gardeners in the southwestern part of the US garden a bit differently than most of the rest of the country because we are always in "drought" conditions. No such thing as summer rains watering a garden. So we are always irrigating and conserving water. Our melons are planted in holes, not mounds. In desert and high desert climates, our corn is planted reverse of the way corn is normally planted. The furrows are the part we walk on, the "paths" (which are lower in elevation) is where the corn is planted. Completely opposite of the traditional midwest farming methods. Or the New Mexico method is used.
    BW