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Guy who bailed it for years stopped by Fri. Wanted to know what I was going to do. I stalled about it, and he left. I hd time to think on it, and so, when I came home, I stopped by his place and asked what hed charge. he said $10 a bale, I said do it, so now im looking at finding a week of good weather. Hes busy this week, so he said to start mowing Fri. Ill have to see what the weather holds for by then. Its going to take longer than normal to get the stems dried enough to bale. Im figuring mow it and wait 2 days, rake it and wait 2 days then bale. A week therebouts.
Ill rake up the green stuff. When he has bailed it, Ill turn over the old windrows, and have him bale them too. IF I get $20 a bale, that will make a bit of profit, and get them off the field.
 

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i hope you go get a $20 camera so you can post pictures again.
 
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Ive got my camera elk. I found it here right where I laid it, but in a different place than where I usually laid it by a couple feet lol.

4X5s, Haygrazer/Sudan grass/ Gotcha grass/ Sorgum Sudan grass
 

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You got a deal FB. If I could get ours baled for $10 per, I'd never put another baler in the field. Hope you catch some good weather. It's hard to find around here these days as we had 4 days with measureable rain last week.
 

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That's what everybody says too,

Elk, Why you want to see pics of the same thing again? It would be of the H mowing, and either it or the CC raking, and most likely the DB bringing the bales off the field. I already got pics of the H and CC doing that.
 

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That's what everybody says too,

Elk, Why you want to see pics of the same thing again? It would be of the H mowing, and either it or the CC raking, and most likely the DB bringing the bales off the field. I already got pics of the H and CC doing that.
i just like seeing the daily doings on others homestead...i just think its neat to see stuff...like all the hay baled across that acreage.

i wouldnt mind seeing it before you cut it to see how its grown and done etc. i might get ideas of planting some of that stuff to chop and drop to add mater to a poor field i have.
 
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I usually give it a day then rake, then rake again the next, and finally I rake then bale the final day. So, counting the day of mowing that gives me a 4 day window.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
How tall is it when you do this? Im figuring around the same or more ifI can get them, as some of this is as tall as I am.
 

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Fellows around here cut prairie hay in the morning and bale it that afternoon.

Never messed with sudan grass, but I helped a fellow bale one year who was running johnson grass thru a crimper. Cut one day, bale the next afternoon. I was running the rake ahead of him and had to keep it going pretty steadily.

My neighbor here has a lot of johnson grass in one of his meadows, and he cuts and bales it just as he does the prairie hay. If it is especially damp he'll run a tedder over it and give it an extra day.

This year we've had such cool weather and so much rain during the hay season that everyone has had to jump to it on the good days.

The first year I was on this place I had no source of hay and had to buy off the newspaper ads. Fellow brought me some hay and dropped on the flat out front. I moved it to the back on a dry ridge and fed it that winter. Mouldy as all get out, but the cows seemed to like it and ate it like candy.

Since then I've bought prairie hay from neighbors. When the cattle break into the hay lot I notice that they first go after the bales with Johnson grass in them. When I close off a pasture and let the cows back in it the first thing they do is eat down the johnson grass.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, I havnt got a crimper OR a tedder.

Yes chuck, like cane sorgum that molasses come out of, theres a sugar in JG and in HG Cows eat it like candy. They don't go bnoseing through the bale looking for the best parts. ITS ALL GOOD
 

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Mouldy as all get out, but the cows seemed to like it and ate it like candy.
Seen my neighbor's cows do the same thing. He baled some damp hay that became terribly moldy, and the cows ate every last bit of that before they would eat any of the "good hay". Maybe it's kind of like silage to them.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My granddad said that once, his hay got rained on multiple times, so he dump raked it in a big ditch. It was either alfalfa, or clover, and likely alfalfa. He said that winter the cows likta broke there legs to get down in that ditch to eat that hay.
 

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I believe grinder alf is around 100-120 a ton here. Lots of rain damaged hay. Sorghum feeds are just starting to be baled up. I wouldn't think price of it would be much behind grinder hays?

IMO... mould lessens quality severely! Even the number of days it is out before being baled lessens quality.,, mould or no? Sorghums are hard to dry, cuz of its stemmy nature and its propensity to produce heavily. Storage and feeding times can make a big difference as well. Sorghums can also be very prone to high nitrates, especially if fertilized. My thinking...it's always wise to have it checked.

Mould can contain toxins to be aware of. A very fine line between tobacco burnt bales and spoilage! For sure they love it when it's just right, but better to err on the safer side.
 

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Gary: Down on the Gulf coast where my brothers live the farmers grow a lot of cotton and milo. Since the drought years began they have been baling the stalks after combining the grain. Prices are right up there with the best prairie hay available, tough and stemmy as the stuff is.

The farmers fertilize the heck out of it, but the cattle have not seemed to suffer. One fellow next to my brother's place got 11,000 pounds per acre off one field, average all around was 8,000, and they all baled the stalks.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
When dad farmed corn and milo, after harvest he would turn the cows out on the fields. They would clean up the milo fields better than the corn fields. That's cause milo, like haygrazer, which is in the same family has a bit of sugar in the stalks. Corn dosent. Or at least not near as much.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Going out to mow today. Supposed to be 50% chance of rain Fri. im more worried about getting the moisture out of the stalks than what rain I may get on them.
I wont mow the pararie hay until the morning that the bailer is coming. Ill leave the mower on the H for that, and rake with the Case.
 
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