Homesteading Forum banner

21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
comfortablynumb said:
the rule of the land here is (so I am told by the old ones) if its dead, take it but call the game warden (they are as thick as flies here) within 10 days so they can record it.
why, I dont have a clue... do they really count all those rotten piles on the road?
They do count the "rotten piles" to help track animal population. The greater the number of roadkill deer, the better chance of the hunters having their bag limits raised.

In Ohio you may also take the deer, provided that a deer kill slip (provided by law enforcement) has been signed. I used to work for a small city and we had a "deer kill list" of county residents who were willing to come out and take freshly killed deer that the drivers didn't want.

Ones that had been left to languish on the roadside were picked up by the "roadkill truck," along with the unwanted opossums, etc. They were shoveled and eventually taken to the rendering plant to be processed into lipstick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,824 Posts
I knew there was a good reason I didn't like lipstick or makeup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Here in Iowa we can keep it. My dh hit a buck about a month ago and we called the DNR and they came out looked at it and said they would send us a tag. (Why would we need a tag AFTER it's been butchered and put in the freezer?)All
"official" pencil pushing I guess. :haha: We processed it all,and had some good eating for nothing.
Carol :eek:
 
G

·
foxies said:
I'm not trying be funny, but in your state what happens to road killed deer.Does the person that hits it, get to keep it? Or is it given to the environmental police.
Check with your state game commission. In Nebraska, the one that hit the deer gets first chance to claim the deer. A tag must be filled out.If the driver does not claim the deer, another person can claim it. Sheriff Dept. has people that are on a call list for roadkill deer.
 
G

·
the biggest issue other than the legalities, is the quality of the meat.Any animal destined for the table needs to be bled and gutted as soon as possible.Road killed animals tend to be bruised and broken up , making immediate bleeding even more important.
I unfortionately hit a yearling near my home- the fender hit it's head,and I cut it's throat and bled it immediately.That was a perfectly good carcass and as good as any deer I;ve taken.
But to come across an animal hours after being hit, and attempt to convert it into meat fit for the table is going to be largely dependent on where the animal was hit, how long ago, and what the temperature is.
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top