abcesses on goat, lots of questions!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by fullhouse, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. fullhouse

    fullhouse Member

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    Hi, we just got our goats last week. They were in need of some grooming, so we clipped them, trimmed hooves, etc. Anyway, the goat I am concerned about is about 8 years old--we are guessing by her teeth--and when we shaved her we discovered several lumps on her. They were not obvious when we bought her because her hair was so shaggy, and we didn't know to check for lumps. Well, she has 4 marble sized hard lumps on the side of her neck, one behind a horn next to her ear, one on her chest, one on her ribcage, a bigger one on her brisket, and a golfball size lump on her flank. This goat is also quite skinny as she was the "low goat" in her old herd and was picked on. We are milking her and pasteurizing the milk. I have a vet coming later this week to look at her, but the vets around here don't do much with goats. Should I be discarding the milk? Should I isolate her from my other goats? I have 2 other does and we found one lump on one of them but no others. My main concern is my families' health and I don't want to have animals around that can make us sick! Also, I am pregnant and I am the milker. None of the abcesses are ruptured. What would you do? Taking the goats back to where we bought them is not an option--"all sales final." The people we bought the goats from have many goats and drink the milk raw with no problems. I will definitely continue pasteurizing. This goat is very gentle and I would hate to have her put down, but the health of my family and the other goats has to be priority. Thanks!
     
  2. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i would not keep any goat on my property with a lump that sound like cl. i would bring them as fast as i can to the sales barn. you don't want the bacteria on your soil or in your barn. you said yourself you didn't see any lumps until you shaved them. now imagine you don't see one lump that has ruptured and smeared all over your place. it will be very very difficult to get rid of this illness from your herd.
    if you need some milk goats i'm sure you can find some that are free of cl.
    where are you located? and since it sound like you have children or at least you will have them very soon, don't take the risk. it's not the milk you get sick. unless the abscess is in the udder. it is the puss out of the lump that is highly contagious.
    susanne
     

  3. fullhouse

    fullhouse Member

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    Thanks, Susanne. The more I think about it, the more I know we will have to get rid of her. Sad day.
     
  4. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    Do you have somewhere away from the other goats to isolate her? You can pull some blood on her and send it in for testing. Getting new goats I would pull blood on all of them and send it in for testing for CAE, CL, Leptospirosis and Brucilosis.
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Didn't you get the goats all from the same person? Then all of your goats carry this zoonic disease. You only have two that are showing abscess, but soon especially if one bursts, or your vet is of the lance and clean school, which leaves you with exude weeping while you spray it with iodine every day, infecting not only your other goats but your property.

    I would cut my losses, send the whole lot to the auction barn for kill only and until you know what CL and CAE are I wouldn't buy another goat. When you do want to purchase again, the purchase of 2 really good clean milkers will give you more milk than 5 or 6 does. With 2 purebred does you would also have babies worth more than those same 5 or 6 unregistered nannies would have.

    Let us help you start right! Why start with goats that the very first thing they do is cause you a vet bill? The folks who sold you these should be shot. No wonder sales are final if they are selling new folks diseased animals. Vicki
     
  6. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    It is unfortunate that some people seem to get "taken" if you will the first time they buy goats... I didn't have diseased goats, but the guy lied about the papers and stupid me believed him...

    I don't sell my goats as CL free, but I do vaccinate them in the hopes that IF I do have it, I will eradicate it eventually. But I also make that clear to my buyers. They HAVE NOT been tested, but they have been vaccinated. We borrowed an old milk goat from a relative who was fine when she left the house. The stress of moving to our house (different from where the goats are) made her erupt. They shot her. Nothing leaked on our property thank goodness. Chalk it up a learning experience.
    www.geocities.com/buckshotboers2003
    www.geocities.com/gonzalesshowpigs
     
  7. fullhouse

    fullhouse Member

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    I just about had myself talked into keeping these goats, but all of your posts are convincing me that it would be a mistake. I am upset because I love the goats, love the fresh milk, and love the "homesteading life" and this has been a dream of mine for a long time. In fact, I finally had the money saved up to buy goats and this is what I got. Dumb me. I do not want anything around that will cause health problems for anyone and I do think the vet would just lance the abcesses and clean them out. I talked to the lady we bought from about the lumps the other day but she said they are no big deal...now I called her about bringing the goats back but she hasn't returned my call. I don't even care if I get my money back (well, I do care but I would just like to get rid of these goats). Well, enough rambling and a very expensive lesson learned. Thanks to everyone who replied.
     
  8. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    Her saying the lumps are no big deal shows what kind of person she is. Research CL & you will find out it is a big deal, even if you are willing to keep them & live with it. I agree with Vicki that they should be taken to a salebarn & marked for slaughter only. You don't want to pass your problems on to someone else.
     
  9. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i started very similar like you last year in november. i discovered very soon that i liked goats very much. because most of them came from a guy that is dealing with meat goats and doesn't really care if they are healthy or not, i sold all my goats to the sales barn and bought some really nice healthy stock from good breeders. i'm very happy with my choice. if you cut your losses now you will be happy in the long run too. i promise :)
     
  10. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    "from a guy that is dealing with meat goats and doesn't really care if they are healthy or not"

    Please don't classify all breeders of meat goats this way...not everyone is like that. I can give you a longer list of people who do take care of their goats than of people who don't.
    Thanks
    www.geocities.com/buckshotboers2003
    www.geocities.com/gonzalesshowpigs
     
  11. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i wouldn't put a breeder in the same spot with a meat dealer. he was not breeding but buying and selling goats for meat. that is different. most goats are staying only couple of days before he hauls the to the auction.
    susanne